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Political Science Civil Rights

Acting for Freedom

Fifty Years of Civil Liberties in Canada

by (author) Marian Botsford Fraser

with Sukanya Pillay & Kent Roach

preface by Joseph Boyden

Publisher
Second Story Press
Initial publish date
Oct 2014
Category
Civil Rights, General, Civil Rights
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781927583494
    Publish Date
    Oct 2014
    List Price
    $29.95
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781927583500
    Publish Date
    Oct 2014
    List Price
    $18.99

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Description

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with this overview of its activities--sometimes quiet and sometimes strident--as a watchdog and safeguard for Canadians and their rights as citizens. Through a series of discussions and interviews, a picture of Canada over the last half-century evolves. From the Charter of Freedoms to life and death matters such as abortion and the death penalty through to public security vs. the right to privacy, and a look forward into issues concerning the next fifty years, comes a picture of Canadian society, past and present. This is a fascinating look at civil rights, of which many Canadians may be unaware or take for granted--until they are needed on a personal level. Illustrated with political cartoons and photographs.

About the authors

Marian Botsford Fraser is a freelance writer, broadcaster, and critic whose work has appeared in "Granta," "The Walrus," "The Globe & Mail," "Toronto Life," and "The National Post." She is a long-time contributor to CBC Radio's "Ideas" program and has served as guest host for various CBC Radio programs. She is the author of "Requiem for my brother," "Solitaire: The Intimate Lives of Single Women," "Walking the Line: Travels Along the Canadian/American Border." She lives in Toronto, ON.

Marian Botsford Fraser's profile page

Sukanya Pillay is a lawyer, law professor, public speaker, and writer. She is also a photographer and has made documentary films. She is recipient of numerous prestigious awards. She is currently the Law Foundation of Ontario Scholar 2017–2018 and a visiting professor at the University of Windsor Faculty of Law.

Sukanya Pillay's profile page

Kent Roach is a professor of law and the Prichard-Wilson Chair of Law and Public Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and of Yale University, and a former law clerk to Justice Bertha Wilson of the Supreme Court of Canada. Professor Roach has been editor-in-chief of the Criminal Law Quarterly since 1998. In 2002, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and in 2013 he was one of four academics awarded a Pierre Elliott Trudeau Fellowship. He is the author of twelve books, including Constitutional Remedies in Canada (winner of the Walter Owen Prize); Due Process and Victims’ Rights (shortlisted for the Donner Prize); The Supreme Court on Trial (shortlisted for the Donner Prize); Brian Dickson: A Judge’s Journey (winner of the Dafoe Prize; co-authored with Robert J. Sharpe); and The 9/11 Effect: Comparative Counter-Terrorism (winner of the David Mundell Medal). He is the co-editor of several collections of essays and published casebooks, including most recently Comparative Counter-Terrorism Law, which arose from his role as General Reporter on Counter-Terrorism Law for the XIX International Congress on Comparative Law held in 2014. With Justice Robert Sharpe, he is the co-author of The Charter of Rights and Freedoms volume in Irwin Law’s Essentials of Canadian Law series. False Security: The Radicalization of Canada’s Terror Law, co-authored with Craig Forcese, was published by Irwin Law in 2015. He has also written over 200 articles and chapters published in Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States, as well as in Canada. Professor Roach has served as research director for the Inquiry into Pediatric Forensic Pathology in Ontario (the Goudge Inquiry) and for the Commission of Inquiry into the Investigation of the Bombing of Air India Flight 182. In both capacities, he edited multiple volumes of research studies. He served on the research advisory committee for the inquiry into the rendition of Maher Arar and the Ipperwash Inquiry into the killing of Dudley George. He was a special advisor to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools. Professor Roach has represented Aboriginal and civil liberties groups in many interventions before the courts, including Gladue, Wells, Ipeelee, and Anderson on sentencing Aboriginal offenders; Latimer on mandatory minimum sentences; Stillman, Dunedin Construction, Downtown East Side Sex Workers, and Ward on Charter remedies; Golden on strip searches; Khawaja on the definition of terrorism; and Corbiere and Sauvé on voting rights. He is the faculty lead for the Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.

Kent Roach's profile page

Joseph Boyden's first novel, Three Day Road, was selected for the Today Show Book Club, won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the CBA Libris Fiction Book of the Year Award, the Amazon.ca/Books in Canada First Novel Award, and the McNally Robinson Aboriginal Book of the Year Award, and was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. His second novel, Through Black Spruce, was awarded the Scotiabank Giller Prize and named the Canadian Booksellers Association Fiction Book of the Year; it also earned him the CBA’s Author of the Year Award. His most recent novel, The Orenda, won Canada Reads and was nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. Boyden divides his time between Northern Ontario and Louisiana.

Joseph Boyden's profile page