New Books and Featured Reading Lists

Each week on the 49th Shelf homepage, we highlight new releases. We also make theme-based lists and showcase lists from guest contributors and 49th Shelf members. This page archives these selections so they are always available to our members.

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New Non-Fiction for the week of April 6th : New Books on Hobbies/ DIY
Gather at Home

Gather at Home

Over 100 Simple Recipes, DIYs, and Inspiration for a Year of Occasions
edition:Hardcover
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Garden Mosaics

Garden Mosaics

19 Beautiful Projects to Make for Your Garden
edition:Paperback
tagged : nature crafts
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The Pocket Butler's Guide to Good Housekeeping

The Pocket Butler's Guide to Good Housekeeping

Expert Advice on Cleaning, Laundry and Home Maintenance
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

Commercial cleaning products—those you find readily available on grocery and hardware store shelves—are very much a product of our time. Before World War II, most households used common ingredients, like baking soda and soap, to meet their cleaning needs. Today, there are thousands of cleaning products avail- able, a different one for every surface imaginable, but the same basic results can be achieved with a much simpler arsenal of cleaning supplies.

Before you start throwing all of your products out, though, let’s understand the different types of products available, and the best uses for them.

Cleaning products can be grouped into three basic types:
· All-Purpose Cleaners: These can be used on any surface. An example of an all-purpose cleaner would be a pH-neutral dish soap and water.

· Multi-Purpose Cleaners: These can be used on multiple different surfaces, but not on all. This category might include a cream cleaner, which is good on ceramic, on most plastics and on tile, but not on wood, marble, or other natural stone surfaces.

· Specific-Purpose Cleaners: These are intended for one type of use only. For example, a silver cleaner should be used only for silver.

The following list includes a variety of multi-purpose and all-purpose household cleaning products that I find useful in day-to-day cleaning. You might already have them in your home. While many of them are safer alternatives to commercial cleaning products, always take time to read the labels and use them with care! And, of course, test cleaners in a small, inconspicuous area before applying them to a larger surface. (For a complete list of materials to stock in your cleaning caddy, see page 41.)
Alcohol
Isopropyl alcohol sanitizes surfaces and can be used on telephone handsets and remote controls. Wear gloves when using isopropyl alcohol, and wash your hands thoroughly afterwards.
 
 
Ammonia
Ammonia is often used straight as a multi-purpose cleaner, and it can also be added to commercial cleaning products. Ammonia is known for providing an excellent “streak-free” finish so it is often used to clean glass, porcelain and stainless steel. It is also frequently used for cleaning ovens and soak- ing items to loosen baked-on grime. NEVER mix it with bleach, though, because that will create toxic fumes!
Baking Soda
Baking soda is one of the most useful common household products. A mild abrasive, it can be used when any gentle scouring is required. Baking soda is safe to use in sinks, bathtubs, showers and pretty much everywhere. Combine it with a little water and a drop of pH-neutral dish soap for a great mildly abrasive cleaner.
Bleach
Chlorine bleach is a harsh but effective chemical for sanitizing and disinfecting. Handle it with care, and follow the instructions on the label. NEVER mix bleach with ammonia or vinegar; the combination will create toxic fumes.
Compressed air
A compressed air duster is the safest and least invasive way to remove dust from electronic components like computer keyboards and audiovisual equipment.
Cream Cleaner
A cream cleaner does not harm most surfaces. It is great for porcelain, stainless steel and ceramic surfaces, among others. I think a good cream cleaner is necessary in every cleaning caddy.
Dish Soap
One of my very favorite cleaning products is ordinary dish soap! Since it is pH-neutral, it does not harm your hands or most surfaces. It is also great at removing grease. Try to get the clear variety to avoid any unnecessary dyes.
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen peroxide is a safer and gentler alternative to chlorine bleach, and it’s effective in sanitizing surfaces. You might not need it in your everyday cleaning caddy, but it should be on hand in your household.
White vinegar
White distilled vinegar is a popular multi-purpose household cleaner. You can use it straight on stainless steel and porcelain surfaces, and diluted with water on most other surfaces, such as glass, mirrors and plastic. Do not use vinegar on marble, granite or other natural stone surfaces, or on wood.
 

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Cultivated

Cultivated

The Elements of Floral Style
edition:Hardcover
also available: Cards
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Super Simple Woodworking and Furniture Making

Super Simple Woodworking and Furniture Making

Glue, Screw, Cap, and Finish Your Way to Strong and Beautiful Projects
edition:Paperback
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The Heart of the Photograph

The Heart of the Photograph

100 Questions for Making Stronger, More Expressive Photographs
edition:Hardcover
tagged : digital, reference
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Books With Vision

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New Non-Fiction for the week of March 30th : New Books on Business
See You On the Internet

See You On the Internet

Building Your Small Business with Digital Marketing
edition:Paperback
tagged :
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The Proximity Paradox

The Proximity Paradox

How to Create Distance from Business as Usual and Do Something Truly Innovative
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

 

A graphic designer is invited to paint a mural on the side of an old building in a rough end of town. She collaborates with a group of artists to turn four storeys of tired brick into a contemporary work of art. When the mural is complete, the neighborhood throws a party to celebrate the first of what they hope will be many rejuvenations to the area. The graphic designer’s boss reads about the mural in the news and asks her, “Why can’t you create something like that around here?”

 

We’ve seen things like this happen again and again for more than ten years. As advertising agency people, we have the opportunity to work with a lot of creative types. We’re not just talking about designers and artists; we’re talking about people with the ability to solve old problems in new, imaginative ways. Advertising agencies and marketing departments attract thousands of these types. Yet it’s rare to see a creative person unleash his or her full potential at work.

 

We call this effect the Proximity Paradox, and that’s what this book is all about. Proximity is the effect that shackles creativity, dilutes innovation, steers brave people down safe roads, and pushes leading-edge companies to the back of the pack. It’s what was blocking your view when a competitor blindsided you. It’s what eventually wore down your bold, inventive younger self, and it’s what is still wearing you down today.

 

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The Case for Climate Capitalism

The Case for Climate Capitalism

Economic Solutions for a Planet in Crisis
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
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Excerpt

 

Climate change defies the traditional divisions between left and right. The response from the far left — led by Naomi Klein and the Pope — targets market forces, economic growth, and capitalism itself as the enemy. Yet climate solutions need all three. The far right — dominated by market fundamentalists like FOX and the Koch brothers — view unfettered markets, unlimited growth, and unregulated capitalism as unassailable foundations of the twenty-first century. But that view is incompatible with a livable planet. The simple ideologies of left and right are unhelpful in trying to solve this problem. It’s time to let them go. Common sense provides a better basis for climate solutions than political or ideological preference.

 

Climate Capitalism is a pragmatic response to a messy problem. To rewire our economy in time to head off disaster, the left and right need to throw out a bunch of comfortable assumptions. The idea that we’re going to jettison capitalism itself is as absurd as it sounds. We need high finance. And market forces. Yet both must be tamed. Unbridled market forces make for great toys and factories but will take us straight off the climate cliff. Not everything can be valued in money or commerce. Some things have worth that can’t be contained in a spreadsheet: the human spirit, our place in the world, values and ethics, our planet itself.

 

The current intellectual trend claims all of human activity can be captured in value-free quantitative analysis. That view is false. We can’t speak to the climate issue without the deep, reflective language of moral philosophy. Intergenerational justice is not measured by what economists call the “discount rate.” The value of nature — the Amazonian rainforest, biodiversity, healthy watersheds — is not captured by estimating their monetary value. Our deeper qualitative concerns must bend (not bend to) the forces of commerce to be effective. Commerce is the tool, human values the force — not vice versa.

 

Yet this book is all about economics: money, trade agreements, discount rates, capital markets, entrepreneurs. Undoubtedly, my environmental friends won’t like the whole-hearted embrace of that language. And many business colleagues will bristle at the call for what they see as radical interference in those markets and a value first approach to weighing costs and benefits. That may be a sign I’ve got something right. In any good negotiation, both sides will feel like they lost. But both also win.

 

Things will get nasty in the climate debate as our world continues to get hotter. There will be fights — not just over ideas but water, food, land, and money. But one thing we can’t fight about anymore is which economic system occupies the high ground. The left and right, the business community and environmentalists, bankers and activists must together reclaim capitalism and force profits to align with the planet. We must retool our laws and institutions to reflect our collective long-term security. We can worry about who occupies the moral high ground later.

 

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The Subscription Boom

The Subscription Boom

Why an Old Business Model is the Future of Commerce
edition:Hardcover
tagged : retailing
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Company of One

Company of One

Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for Business
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
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The Reinventionist Mindset

The Reinventionist Mindset

Learning to love change, and the human how of doing it brilliantly
edition:Hardcover
tagged : leadership
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What It Takes

What It Takes

To Live And Lead with Purpose, Laughter, and Strength
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
tagged :
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How to Retire Debt-Free and Wealthy

How to Retire Debt-Free and Wealthy

A Finance Coach Reveals the Secrets, Tips, and Techniques of How Clients Become Millionaires
edition:Paperback
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This week's recommended reading lists

Books With Vision

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Tree Books

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New Children's for the week of March 23rd : New Kids' Nonfiction
On Our Nature Walk

On Our Nature Walk

Our First Talk About Our Impact on the Environment
by Jillian Roberts
illustrated by Jane Heinrichs
foreword by Bob McDonald
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover
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New Fiction for the week of March 9th : New Poetry
The Dyzgraphxst
Excerpt

in an infinite series where we approach each oth’r
Jejune, forked in some road that might have
cropped up anyhow to cross us barely ready

or were we unaware that we had cracked I
to save us, split us three ways
as the centuries that made us possible left us

with all possible comprises, we have this one
existence, this so many elsewheres, in others,
I, and in every elsewhere, us both

and so you have arrived, Jejune, and so I
in a million pictures of our face, and still
I was not myself, i am not myself, myself

resembles something having nothing to do
with me and the idea that I would like
a holiday, a whole lifetime from this bend

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This week's recommended reading lists

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