About the Author

Pat Crocker

Pat Crocker (Neustadt, Ontario CA) is the author of 18 cookbooks and a culinary herbalist with more than 1.25 million books in print. She was honored twice by the International Herb Association’s Professional Award, and also received the 2009 Gertrude H. Foster award from the Herb Society of America for Excellence in Herbal Literature. Her books, The Juicing Bible and The Vegan Cook’s Bible (both published by Robert Rose) have won “Best in the World” awards from the International Gourmand Culinary Guild.The past president of both the Ontario Herbalists’ Association and Home Economics Associations, Pat actively participates in the Herb Society of America, the International Herb Association, the International Association of Culinary Professionals, Cuisine Canada, and the Culinary Historians of Canada.patcrocker.comThe author lives and works in Neustadt, Ontario, Canada.

Books by this Author
150 Best Tagine Recipes

150 Best Tagine Recipes

Includes Recipes for Spice Blends and Accompaniments
edition:Paperback
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Coconut 24/7

Coconut 24/7

edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Coconut 24/7 Low Price Edition

Easy Ways to Look and Feel Better
edition:Paperback
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Everyday Flexitarian

Everyday Flexitarian

Recipes for vegetarians & meat lovers alike
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Excerpt

The ancients did it, Einstein recommended it, and David Suzuki supports it. The trend of eating less meat is centuries old, but for many North Americans it is a new trend and way of life. Every year more and more people move toward a healthier, plant-based diet. There is no doubt that the earth and its inhabitants fare better when meat is not a priority at dinner (or at lunch or breakfast, for that matter). And yet for some body types, it is not medically advisable to eliminate meat completely; responsible consumption of small amounts of organic beef, lamb, chicken, and fish may be beneficial for them. What we see evolving is a flexible way of thinking about food, cooking it, and serving it to family and friends.

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Flex Appeal

Flex Appeal

A Vegetarian Cookbook for Families with Meat-Eaters
edition:Paperback
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Kitchen Herbal

Kitchen Herbal

From Garden to Kitchen, New Perspectives on Herbs
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

Herbs add spirit to cooking. They awaken and stimulate the palate, adding an extra dimension of liveliness in return for very little effort. With assertive herbs in the pot, there is less need for salt, butter and cream. To start cooking with herbs, use only one new herb each time you try a dish. But be generous. Fresh herbs have a richer, smoother, more complex flavour than do dried herbs which tend to be sharp or bitter. For that reason, fresh herbs can be measured by the handful or sprig.

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The Ayurveda Solution to Type 2 Diabetes
Excerpt

Sample Recipes from The Ayurveda Solution to Type 2 Diabetes: A Clinically Proven Program to Balance Blood Sugar in 12 Weeks by Jackie Christensen Ph.D. and Pat Crocker

Kitchari  [one-week detox]

This dish is a key recipe to the Ayurveda Solution Diet for all doshas -– use it as a daily staple during the one-week detox. For variety, add 2 cups chopped vegetables (recommended for your dosha) in the last 10 minutes of cooking.

  • ¾ cup yellow split mung beans (see recipe notes)
  • ¼ cup barley (see recipe notes)
  • 1 tablespoon ghee or extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon ground coriander
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon ground fennel
  • ½ teaspoon ground fenugreek
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 3 cups water
  1. Combine beans and barley in a colander. Rinse well and set aside to drain.
  2. Heat ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add coriander, cumin, fennel, fenugreek, and turmeric and stir well.
  3. Stir in beans, barley and water. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low. Simmer for 45 minutes or until the water has been absorbed and the consistency is similar to soupy porridge.

Makes 2 servings

Recipe Notes: Yellow mung beans (Vigna radiata) have been hulled and dried. They are available whole or split. The Indian word dal (or dahl) is often translated as “legumes,” but can mean many different lentils, peas, chickpeas, and beans that have been split, so we use the term “split mung beans” or “mung dal” -- to say “split mung dal” would be redundant. It gets complicated because a dish that is made with any kind of dried pea or bean (aka pulse) is called a dal. The other confusing fact is that mung beans are not actually beans or lentils but are part of the legume family.

Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is a cereal grain that is part of the grass family. It is sold in several forms including hulled or groats, hull-less, grits, flakes, pearl, scotch, quick, and flour. The whole, hulled form (also known as barley groats or Scotch barley) is healthiest because only the tough, outer hull has been removed, leaving all of the fiber and nutrients found in the whole grain. Whole, hulled barley is not widely available but may be found in natural/whole foods stores. Pearl barley is most common and, because it has been processed to remove the natural bran coating, it cooks faster and is less chewy.

 

Black and Gold Breakfast Bowl [Breakfast, Pitta]

Satisfying and delicious, black rice is super-charged with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients. For a savory change, substitute chopped artichoke, asparagus, or shredded carrot for the apple and strawberries.

  • 2 ¼ cups water
  • 1 cup black rice
  • 1 cup chopped apple
  • Warm Golden Milk
  • 1 can (14-ounce) coconut milk
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped goji berries or quartered strawberries
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon cardamom
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ cup unsweetened coconut flakes

Bring water to a boil in a covered saucepan over high heat. Stir in rice, cover, and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer for 30 to 35 minutes or until water is absorbed and rice is tender. Turn heat off and quickly stir in apple.

  1. Cover and let rice and apple stand on the burner for 5 minutes. Remove lid, stir, and set aside to cool.
  2. Meantime, combine milk, berries, turmeric, cardamom, cinnamon, and ginger in a saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, whisking constantly for 3 minutes or until small bubbles appear around the edges of the pan. Remove from heat.
  3. Spoon rice into serving bowls and pour milk over. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon coconut flakes over.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

 

Quinoa Bowl with Lentils and Vegetables [Lunch, Vata]

For variety, try different Vata vegetables every time you prepare this recipe. It makes a beautiful presentation when served in a glass bowl but you can layer the ingredients into four or six individual bowls.

  • 2 tablespoons ghee or olive oil, divided
  • ½ onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Vata Spice Blend, page xx or see Recipe Note
  • 4 cups water or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup dried red lentils
  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen (defrosted) corn kernels
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen (defrosted) 1-inch pieces green beans
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 avocados, peeled and diced
  1. Heat 1 tablespoon ghee in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring frequently for 5 minutes or until translucent. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes, stirring frequently for 1 minute. Stir in spice blend and mix well.
  2. Add water and bring to a light boil. Stir in lentils and quinoa and reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer for 25 minutes or until lentils are tender.
  3. Meanwhile, heat remaining ghee in a large skillet over medium heat. Add corn and green beans. Cook, stirring constantly for 7 minutes or until vegetables are crisp-tender.
  4. Toss vinegar and avocados together in a small bowl.
  5. To assemble: Scrape quinoa-lentil mixture into a large glass or wooden salad bowl. Spread cooked corn and beans over. Spread avocados and vinegar over all.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Recipe Note: If you don’t have the Vata Spice Blend (page xx), combine the following spices and use them in place of the blend:

  • 1 teaspoon ground chili, optional
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander

 

Carrot-Zucchini Ribbons with Avocado Drizzle [Lunch, Pitta]

As a variation, you could use 1 cup shaved Brussels sprouts, 1 cup chopped cabbage, 1 cup chopped bell pepper, and 1 cup 1-inch cut green beans in place of the carrots, zucchini and eggplant.

  • Ribbons
  • 2 large carrots
  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 1 medium Japanese eggplant
  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 cups cooked lima beans
  • Avocado Drizzle
  • ½ lime, juiced
  • 2 avocados, peeled and diced
  • about 4 tablespoons extra-avocado oil
  1. Peel and cut carrots, zucchini and eggplant into thin ribbons using a mandolin slicer.
  2. Heat ghee in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring frequently for 2 minutes or until soft and fragrant. Add carrot, zucchini and eggplant ribbons and cook, tossing frequently for 7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Stir in lima beans and cook, stirring constantly, for about 3 minutes or until beans are heated through.
  3. Make Drizzle: Combine lime juice and avocados in a small bowl. Mash using a fork. Add oil, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a thin consistency is achieved.
  4. Divide ribbons into 4 equal portions and pile on plates. Drizzle each with avocado mixture.

Makes 4 servings

 

Vegetable-Mung Bean Pots with Seed Crust [Dinner, Kapha]

The seed crust is crunchy and makes a tasty topping for the beans and vegetable stew. Be sure to use ovenproof pots or ramekins for this oven-baked dish.

  • Bean Pots
  • 1-1/2 cups water or vegetable stock
  • ½ cup split mung beans
  • 2 tablespoons ghee, divided
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 broccoli, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • Seed Crust
  • 1 cup cooked wild rice
  • ½ cup sunflower seeds
  • ¼ cup flaxseeds
  • ¼ cup pumpkin seeds
  • about ¼ cup sunflower or almond oil
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F. Place 4 heatproof ramekins or small bowls on a baking sheet and set aside.
  2. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan over high heat. Add beans, reduce heat to medium-high and simmer for 30 minutes or until tender. Drain and combine with 1 tablespoon ghee in a bowl. Set aside.
  3. Meanwhile, heat remaining ghee in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes. Add carrot, celery, zucchini, and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, for 7 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Remove from heat and stir in tomato sauce and cooked mung beans. Divide mixture into 4 equal portions and spoon into heatproof ramekins.
  4. Make Seed Crust: Combine rice and seeds in the bowl of a food processor. With the motor running, add oil through the funnel in the lid until the mixture starts to clump together. Divide crust mixture into 4 equal portions and pat over vegetable mixture in ramekins. Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes or until bean mixture is bubbling and crust is browned.

Makes 4 servings

 

Spaghetti Squash, Turkey and Greens in Lemon Broth [Dinner, Vata]

This makes about 1-1/2 cups extra broth that you can enjoy between meals or as a pre-dinner aperitif. You could use a mixture totaling 4 cups chopped summer squash, asparagus, green beans, kale, or rutabaga in place of the squash. Omit step 1 and add vegetables in step 3 with carrots and parsnips.

  • 1 spaghetti squash, halved
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or ghee
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 lb boneless, skinless turkey breast
  • 2 carrots, sliced crosswise into coins
  • 2 parsnips, sliced crosswise into coins
  • 2 cups spinach or turnip greens
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F. Scoop out seeds from squash and drizzle cut sides with olive oil. Place cut side down on a parchment-lined, rimmed baking sheet. Roast in preheated oven for 40 minutes or until flesh is easy to shred.
  2. Meanwhile, bring broth, lemon juice, and garlic to a boil in a large pot over high heat. Reduce heat and when broth is gently simmering, add turkey. Cook in simmering broth for 15 to 20 minutes or until temperature reaches 160° F. Lift turkey out to a plate and set aside.
  3. Add carrots and parsnips to the broth and simmer for 7 minutes or until vegetables are crisp-tender. Lift out of broth using a slotted spoon and divide evenly among 6 bowls.
  4. Add spinach to broth and cook for 1 minute or until wilted. Lift out and divide evenly among the bowls.
  5. Shred turkey using 2 forks and divide evenly into 6 portions and add to bowls. Shred squash, divide evenly into 6 portions and add to bowls. Spoon ¼ cup of the broth over each bowl and serve immediately.
  6. Store remaining broth in a covered jar in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Heat and serve as a between-meal drink or as an appetizer before lunch or dinner.
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