About the Author

Pat Crocker

PAT CROCKER is a home economist, culinary herbalist and bestselling, international award-winning author of 10 cookbooks including Preserving. Pat’s The Vegan Cook’s Bible won Best in the World in the vegetarian category in Périgueux, France, in 2009, and the Juicing Bible won Best in the World in the nutrition category in 2000 and has sold over 800,000 copies.

Books by this Author
150 Best Tagine Recipes

150 Best Tagine Recipes

Including Tantalizing Recipes for Spice Blends and Accompaniments
edition:Paperback
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Coconut 24/7

Coconut 24/7

edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Coconut 24/7 Low Price Edition

Easy Ways to Look and Feel Better
edition:Paperback
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Everyday Flexitarian

Everyday Flexitarian

Recipes for vegetarians & meat lovers alike
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Excerpt

The ancients did it, Einstein recommended it, and David Suzuki supports it. The trend of eating less meat is centuries old, but for many North Americans it is a new trend and way of life. Every year more and more people move toward a healthier, plant-based diet. There is no doubt that the earth and its inhabitants fare better when meat is not a priority at dinner (or at lunch or breakfast, for that matter). And yet for some body types, it is not medically advisable to eliminate meat completely; responsible consumption of small amounts of organic beef, lamb, chicken, and fish may be beneficial for them. What we see evolving is a flexible way of thinking about food, cooking it, and serving it to family and friends.

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Flex Appeal

Flex Appeal

A Vegetarian Cookbook for Families with Meat-Eaters
edition:Paperback
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Kitchen Herbal

Kitchen Herbal

From Garden to Kitchen, New Perspectives on Herbs
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

Herbs add spirit to cooking. They awaken and stimulate the palate, adding an extra dimension of liveliness in return for very little effort. With assertive herbs in the pot, there is less need for salt, butter and cream. To start cooking with herbs, use only one new herb each time you try a dish. But be generous. Fresh herbs have a richer, smoother, more complex flavour than do dried herbs which tend to be sharp or bitter. For that reason, fresh herbs can be measured by the handful or sprig.

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