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Fiction Native American & Aboriginal

The Evolution of Alice

by (author) David A. Robertson

foreword by Shelagh Rogers

Publisher
Portage & Main Press
Initial publish date
Jun 2020
Category
Native American & Aboriginal, Contemporary Women, Short Stories (single author), Family Life, Small Town & Rural
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781553799177
    Publish Date
    Jun 2020
    List Price
    $19.95
  • Downloadable audio file

    ISBN
    9781553799139
    Publish Date
    Jun 2020
    List Price
    $28.00
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781553799184
    Publish Date
    Jul 2020
    List Price
    $16.00

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Where to buy it

Recommended Age, Grade, and Reading Levels

  • Age: 18
  • Grade: 12

Description

Alice is a single mother raising her three young daughters on the rez where she grew up. Life has never been easy, but she's managed to get by with the support of her best friend, Gideon, and her family. When an unthinkable loss occurs, Alice is forced to confront truths that will challenge her belief in herself and the world she thought she knew.

Peopled with unforgettable characters and told from multiple points of view, this is a novel where spirits are alive, forgiveness is possible, and love is the only thing that matters.

Reissued with a new story by David A. Robertson and foreword by Shelagh Rogers.

About the authors

DAVID A. ROBERTSON is the winner of the Beatrice Mosionier Aboriginal Writer of the Year Award, the John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer and the TWUC Freedom to Read Award. His books include The Barren Grounds: The Misewa SagaWhen We Were Alone (winner of the Governor General’s Award, a finalist for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award and a McNally Robinson Best Book for Young People); Will I See? (winner of the Manuela Dias Book Design and Illustration Award, graphic novel category); and the YA novel Strangers (recipient of the Michael Van Rooy Award for Genre Fiction). He is the creator and host of the podcast Kiwew. Through his writings about Canada’s Indigenous peoples, Robertson educates as well as entertains, reflecting Indigenous cultures, histories and communities while illuminating many contemporary issues. David A. Robertson is a member of Norway House Cree Nation. He lives in Winnipeg.

 

David A. Robertson's profile page

Shelagh Rogers began her career at CKWS Radio and Television in Kingston, Ontario in country music, news and TV weather.

In the early 1980’s, she joined CBC Radio in Ottawa. She moved to Toronto in 1984. In 1986, she interviewed Peter Gzowski about his plans to raise money for literacy. Peter then invited her to read the listener mail on his program Morningside. It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

For ten years, she was host of The Arts Tonight, part of the wildly popular Humline Trio on Basic Black and sidekick to the inimitable Max Ferguson. In 1995, Peter Gzowski created a new role for Shelagh: Deputy Host of Morningside. In September of 2000, Rogers began two years as host of CBC Radio's flagship current affairs program This Morning. Her morning time slot morphed into Sounds Like Canada, which is now based out of Vancouver.
Shelagh adds her voice to a number of causes including mental illness awareness, homelessness, homeless youth training. She has been a literacy volunteer for more than two decades, continuing to make real Peter’s dream of ensuring everyone in this richly blessed country has the right to literacy. In her spare time, being gifted with surplus adipose tissue, she is a passionate ocean swimmer and doesn’t feel the cold at all.

Shelagh is the author of Canada, a book of photographs by the great Winnipeg photographer Mike Grandmaison. It’s published by Key Porter. She also contributed to Nobody’s Mother, a collection of essays by and about women who haven’t had children.

Three recent honours mean a lot to Shelagh: the John Drainie Award for Significant Contribution to Canadian Broadcasting, an Honourary Doctorate from the University of Western Ontario and a Certificate for best spring-roll maker and egg cracker from Mitzi’s Sister Restaurant in Toronto. 

Shelagh Rogers' profile page

Editorial Reviews

I felt I was holding my breath as I read, because of the great sorrow, mysteries, wisdom, and love in this book. Beautifully written, and such memorable characters!

Dora Dueck

Robertson writes feelingly of casual cruelties and everyday kindnesses. The novel follows… overlapping, sometimes unexpected connections of family and community, but it is held together by Robertson’s own voice, which is immediate, unflinching, and emotionally generous.

Winnipeg Free Press

Pulsing at the heart of this novel are the warmly rendered inflections of storytelling voices like Gideon’s, at once reflective, vivid, and vernacular. And at the novel’s core, the broken but ultimately healing rhythms of Alice’s 'evolution'—her cycles of loving and suffering, of her family’s living, dying, and ultimately hoping to live anew — bring contemporary experience on the reservation and in the big city achingly, joyfully, and always pungently alive.

Neil Besner, Professor, The University of Winnipeg

Robertson weaves seemingly separate points of view into a chorus of voices that sings our lost ones home. The Evolution of Alice is a story that uplifts, a tragedy not unusual but freshly told, and a read that will echo long after you’ve put it down. 

Katherena Vermette

So many Manitobans have, like a character in an early chapter, only sped by reserves on the highway. Inviting us into a rich community of characters, which stretches deeper than the headlines most of us associate with reserve life, Robertson is doing a service to everyone who calls Manitoba home. And crafting an engaging story of one family’s recovery from loss—at a time when Indigenous peoples are increasingly flexing political, economic and cultural muscle in this country—is a gift for everyone hoping for a better future for our divided country…

Matthew TenBruggencate, CTV Winnipeg

Other titles by David A. Robertson

Resurgence

Engaging With Indigenous Narratives and Cultural Expressions In and Beyond the Classroom

edited by Katya Adamov Ferguson & Christine M'Lot
by (author) K.C. Adams, Sonya Ballantyne, Charlene Bearhead, Wilson Bearhead, Lisa Boivin, Rita Bouvier, Nicola I. Campbell, Sara Florence Davidson, Louise B. Halfe, Lucy Hemphill, Wanda John-Kehewin, Elizabeth LaPensee, Victoria McIntosh, Reanna Merasty, David A. Robertson & Russell Wallace

The Great Bear

The Misewa Saga, Book Two

by (author) David A. Robertson

Black Water

Family, Legacy, and Blood Memory

by (author) David A. Robertson

Sugar Falls

A Residential School Story

by (author) David A. Robertson
illustrated by Scott B. Henderson & Donovan Yaciuk
foreword by Murray Sinclair
afterword by Betty Ross

On the Trapline

by (author) David A. Robertson
illustrated by Julie Flett

Breakdown

by (author) David A. Robertson
illustrated by Scott B. Henderson & Donovan Yaciuk

Ispík kákí péyakoyak/When We Were Alone

by (author) David A. Robertson
illustrated by Julie Flett
translated by Alderick Leask

The Barren Grounds

The Misewa Saga, Book One

by (author) David A. Robertson

Ghosts

by (author) David A. Robertson

This Place

150 Years Retold

by (author) Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, Sonny Assu, Brandon Mitchell, Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley, Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley, David A. Robertson, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, Jen Storm, Richard Van Camp, Katherena Vermette & Chelsea Vowel
illustrated by Tara Audibert, Kyle Charles, G.M.B. Chomichuk, Natasha Donovan, Scott B. Henderson, Andrew Lodwick, Scott A. Ford, Donovan Yaciuk & Ryan Howe
foreword by Alicia Elliott

Other titles by Shelagh Rogers