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9781773060125_interior Enlarge Cover
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list price: $14.95
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover Paperback
published: May 2017
ISBN:9781773060125

Harvey

How I Became Invisible

by Herve Bouchard, illustrated by Janice Nadeau, translated by Helen Mixter

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death & dying
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $14.95
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover Paperback
published: May 2017
ISBN:9781773060125
Description

A sophisticated and original graphic novel, about a young boy's reaction to his father's death.

Harvey and his little brother are playing in the slushy streets of early spring when they learn, out of the blue, that their father has died of a heart attack. Everything changes and Harvey’s favorite movie, The Incredible Shrinking Man, suddenly begins to dominate his fantasy life. When relatives try to get him to look at his father in his coffin, Harvey finds himself disappearing.

Brilliantly illustrated, emotionally true and devastatingly sad, this book is an artful and utterly convincing study of one boy’s response to great loss.

About the Authors
Herve Bouchard is a professor of literature at the Cegep de Chicoutimi and a novelist. He lives in Saguenay, Quebec.
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Janice Nadeau studied graphic design and illustration at the Université du Québec à Montréal and at the École supérieure des arts décoratifs de Strasbourg (France). She likes to explore different applications of her medium, whether it's illustrating books or designing textile. Janice is a three-time recipient of the Governor General's Award for Illustration, Canada's most prestigious literary prize.
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Helen Mixter is a translator who lives in Toronto, Ontario.
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Recommended Age, Grade, and Reading Levels
Age:
10 to 100
Grade:
5 to 17
Reading age:
10 to 100

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Reader Reviews

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Canadian Children's  Book Centre
Librarian review

Harvey

Harvey’s story, we learn early on, is about the time when he lost his father and became invisible. Then Harvey takes us back to the beginning — to the day when he and his friends are coming home from school, racing toothpicks down the gutter. However, when he and his brother get home, they are just in time to see their father being taken away in an ambulance and their mother weeping.

What follows is a touching child’s-eye-view of what happens to a sensitive boy when he is told his father has died. The illustrations are simply drawn and also deeply moving. The series of pages where Harvey’s mother is leaning on the priest while a crowd of people slowly disperse is heart-rending.

This book might be best described as a graphic novel. The words and illustrations combine wonderfully to create a poignant, slow-moving story that hits all the right notes. In places there are pages with only pictures and other places where there are full pages of hand drawn text. This is both a simply told story for children and a literary story making references that only adults are likely to understand. It is easy to understand why Harvey won the 2009 Governor General’s Literary Award (French) for both text and illustration.

As with many books that deal with the subject of death, this book may not be appropriate for all children; but for any child dealing with loss, this story places grief into an ordinary daily context and shows one way in which that grief might be expressed in the world.

Source: The Canadian Children's Bookcentre. Winter 2011. Volume 34 No. 1.

Canadian Children's  Book Centre
Librarian review

Harvey

What starts out as a relatively normal day for a young boy turns into one of confusion, disbelief and denial. This powerfully illustrated graphic novel tells of how one child deals with the loss of his father and the impact it has upon him. First published in French as Harvey, this title was the first to win the Governor General’s Literary Award in both children’s categories (text and illustration).

Source: The Canadian Children’s Book Centre. Best Books for Kids & Teens. 2011.

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