Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search

Literary Criticism Canadian

E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake

Collected Poems and Selected Prose

by (author) E. Pauline Johnson

edited by Carole Gerson & Veronica Strong-Boag

Publisher
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division
Initial publish date
Jun 2002
Category
Canadian, Native American, General
  • Hardback

    ISBN
    9780802036704
    Publish Date
    Jun 2002
    List Price
    $97.00
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9780802084972
    Publish Date
    Jun 2002
    List Price
    $44.95
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781442674158
    Publish Date
    Jun 2002
    List Price
    $105.00

Add it to your shelf

Where to buy it

Description

E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake) was a Native advocate of part-Mohawk ancestry, an independent woman during the period of first-wave feminism, a Canadian nationalist who also advocated strengthening the link to imperial England, a popular and versatile prose writer, and one of modern Canada's best-selling poets. Johnson longed to see the publication of a complete collection of her verse, but that wish remained unfulfilled during her life. Nine decades after her death, the first complete collection of all of Pauline Johnson's known poems, many painstakingly culled from newspapers, magazines, and archives, is now available.

In response to the current recognition of Johnson's historical position as an immensely popular and influential figure of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this volume also presents a representative selection of her prose, including fiction about native-settler relations, journalism about women and recreation, and discussions of gender roles and racial stereotypes.

Edited by Carole Gerson and Veronica Strong-Boag, authors of the enthusiastically received Paddling Her Own Canoe: Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake), this collection exhibits the same impeccable scholarship and is essential to a full understanding of Johnson as a major Canadian writer and cultural figure.

About the authors

Emily Pauline Johnson was born on March 10, 1861 at Chiefswood, her family home on the Six Nations Reserve near Brantford, Ontario. Her father was George Johnson, a distinguished Mohawk chief. She was equally proud of her British-born mother, Emily Howells, and valued her dual heritage. Pauline was an accomplished poet by her late teens, and her earliest poetry recitals were a great success. From 1892 until 1909, she toured Canada, the United States, and Britain, giving dramatic performances of her poetry and entertaining audiences of all ages with the stories of her people. After her retirement in 1909, she settled in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her published works of poetry and fiction also include The White Wampum (1895), Canadian Born (1903), Flint and Feather (1912) and The Shagganappi (1913).
E. Pauline Johnson died in 1913 and her ashes are buried in Vancouver’s Stanley Park.

E. Pauline Johnson's profile page

Born in Montreal, Carole Gerson is a professor in the English Department at Simon Fraser University. Her research on Canadian literary and publishing history and on early Canadian women writers has resulted in many publications, including two books on Pauline Johnson. She was a member of the editorial team for the major three-volume project History of the Book in Canada, for which she co-edited volume 3, covering the period 1918–1980.

Carole Gerson's profile page

Veronica Strong-Boag is a professor of women’s and gender studies and of educational studies at the University of British Columbia. She is a member of the Royal Society of Canada and a past president of the Canadian Historical Association. She has written widely on the history of Canadian women and children—including studies of the 1920s and 30s, the experience of post—WW II suburbia, Nellie L. McClung, E. Pauline Johnson, childhood disabilities, and modern neo-conservatism’s attack on women and children—and has won the John A. Macdonald Prize in Canadian History, the 2012 Canada Prize in the Social Sciences awarded by the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences and, with Carole Gerson, the Raymond Klibansky Prize in the Humanities. In 2012 Strong-Boag was awarded the Tyrrell Medal from the Royal Society of Canada for outstanding work in Canadian history. She is the author of Fostering Nation: Canada Confronts Its History of Childhood Disadvantage (WLU Press, 2010).

Veronica Strong-Boag's profile page

Other titles by E. Pauline Johnson

Other titles by Carole Gerson

Other titles by Veronica Strong-Boag