About the Author

Julie Van Rosendaal

Julie Van Rosendaal was an avid cook as early as age three. When her father, known for his insatiable sweet tooth, found out he had high cholesterol, Julie took her expertise in the kitchen and began creating healthier and low fat recipes for cookies and sweets. After spending years doing research and experimenting in the kitchen, Julie developed a knack for taking recipes of foods that she craved, typically high in fat, and creating a healthier version. At the same time, she realized that dieting was silly and began to live on her own terms. She simply cooked and ate healthier versions of the foods she loved. In addition to giving her ideas for health-conscious cookbooks (which would eventually become bestsellers), this change in lifestyle led Julie to lose 165 pounds—a testament to the effectiveness and practicality of her recipes and food philosophy. Quickly the demand for her delicious low fat recipes became so great that she opened her own low fat bakery in Calgary, Alberta. With the great success of this bakery, Julie decided to share her low fat recipes with the world—in One Smart Cookie, among other cookbooks. Referred to as the “queen of the skinny sweet” and the “poster girl for low fat cooking,” Julie is in high demand for her knowledge and expertise. She has appeared on numerous television and radio shows, led many cooking demonstrations across North America, and regularly contributes to newspapers and magazines.

Books by this Author
Gatherings

Gatherings

Bringing People Together with Food
edition:Paperback
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Grazing

Grazing

Small Batch Preserving for the New Cook
edition:eBook
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Excerpt

Our crazy schedules and love for food make snacking common and portable food hugely popular, whether we eat three meals a day like our moms taught us to or not. Many of us grab whatever might pass for breakfast on the way out the door. If you eat lunch anywhere but at home, you’re either taking it with you or buying it somewhere. And who doesn’t eat in the car? Everyone needs a little smackerel of something after work or school or before a workout. If you have kids, they require an almost constant supply of snacks. Then there are parties and social functions, that empty space beside your latte, and the absolute need to munch during a movie. Grazing has become our eating pattern of choice, and the good news is—doctors and nutritionists all over the world believe that it’s the healthiest way to eat! Eating several smaller meals and snacks over the course of the day (rather than two or three big ones) keeps your energy levels high and blood sugar levels on an even keel. And studies have shown that grazing also lowers your cholesterol, and consequently your risk of heart disease and stroke. Eating regularly also keeps your mind alert and hunger at bay, which will make you less likely to become ravenous and devour enough food to sustain an entire Boy Scout troop. (Not that I’d know from personal experience or anything.)

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In the Dog Kitchen

In the Dog Kitchen

Great Snack Recipes for Your Dog
edition:Paperback
also available: Paperback eBook
tagged : reference
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One Smart Cookie

One Smart Cookie

All Your Favourite Cookies, Squares, Brownies And Biscotti... With Less Fat
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
tagged : low fat
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Out of the Orchard

Out of the Orchard

Recipes for Fresh Fruit from the Sunny Okanagan
edition:Paperback
tagged : fruit, canadian
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Spilling The Beans

Spilling The Beans

Cooking And Baking With Beans Everyday
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Excerpt

Beans. We know them well, but as familiar as they are, a huge number of us don't have a clue what to do with them once we get them home to our kitchens. It's amazing that legumes, which have been around for centuries and are present in nearly every cuisine around the world, are still such a mystery even to skilled cooks. The process of soaking and simmering seems daunting, even though it requires even less culinary skill than cooking rice or pasta. All legumes-beans, chickpeas, peas, and lentils-are high in fibre, protein, and other essential nutrients. They're low in fat, cholesterol-free, versatile, environmentally friendly, and cheap. They could very well be the world's most perfect food.

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Spilling the Beans

Spilling the Beans

100 Fast, Fresh, and Healthy Recipes
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
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Excerpt

Beans. We know them well, but as familiar as they are, a huge number of us don’t have a clue what to do with them once we get them home to our kitchens. It’s amazing that legumes, which have been around for centuries and are present in nearly every cuisine around the world, are still such a mystery even to skilled cooks. The process of soaking and simmering seems daunting, even though it requires even less culinary skill than cooking rice or pasta. All legumes—beans, chickpeas, peas, and lentils—are high in fibre, protein, and other essential nutrients. They’re low in fat, cholesterol-free, versatile, environmentally friendly, and cheap. They could very well be the world’s most perfect food.

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Starting Out

Starting Out

The Essential Guide to Cooking on Your Own
edition:Paperback
tagged : reference
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Calgary Eats

Calgary Eats

Signature Recipes from the City's Best Restaurants and Bars
edition:Hardcover
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