About the Author

Elizabeth Baird

ELIZABETH BAIRD began her career as a champion of Canadian cuisine with her 1975 book Classic Canadian Cooking. For many years she was the food editor of Canadian Living magazine, and she has written and edited many bestselling cookbooks. She contributes a weekly food column to the Toronto Sun. In 2013 she was appointed to the Order of Canada for her contributions to the promotion of Canada's diverse food heritage, as an author and former food editor of Canadian Living magazine.

Books by this Author

Classic Canadian Cooking

Menus for the Seasons
edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback
tagged : canadian
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Elizabeth Baird's Favourites

150 Classic Canadian Recipes
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
tagged : canadian
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Recipes for Victory

Recipes for Victory

Great War Food from the Front and Kitchens Back Home in Canada
edition:Paperback
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The Complete Canadian Living Cookbook

The Complete Canadian Living Cookbook

350 Inspired Recipes from Elizabeth Baird and the Kitchen Canadians Trust Most
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

Two-Cheese Tomato Tart

Celebrate summer with a tomato-topped tart underpinned with creamy Fontina and stretchy mozzarella.

Ingredients
3 Sheets phyllo pastry
1/4 cup (50 mL) Butter, melted
1/3 cup (75 mL) Dijon mustard
3 oz (90 g) Mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
3 oz (90 g) Fontina cheese, thinly sliced
2 Tomatoes, thinly sliced
1 Large clove garlic, minced
2 tbsp (25 mL) Chopped fresh oregano (or 2 tsp/10 mL dried)
2 tbsp (25 mL) Olive oil
Salt and pepper

Preparation
1. Cut each sheet of phyllo in half crosswise; lay 1 half on tea towel, keeping remaining halves covered with damp towel. Brush sheet with melted butter. Place another sheet over the first, making sure edges are not perfectly aligned; brush with 1 tbsp (15 mL) of the mustard. Roughly layer remaining sheets, alternating butter and mustard, and ending with mustard. Gently lift into 14-3/4-inch x 4-1/2-inch (37.5 x 11.5 cm) rectangular flan form with removable bottom. Spread remaining mustard on top. Fold phyllo edges under to create ruffled effect.

2. Cover with layer of mozzarella and Fontina cheese. Arrange tomato slices on top, overlapping them in long rows. Sprinkle with garlic, oregano and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place form on baking sheet and bake in 375 F (190 C) oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until phyllo is golden.

Makes 4 servings (you can also serve this tart as an appetizer to serve 8)
Creamy Pumpkin Pie
Yes, this pie is old-fashioned, but no other dessert is so connected to the memories of romping in golden fall leaves, country drives and our beloved Thanksgiving.

1-1/2 cups (375 mL)all-purpose flour
2 tsp (10 mL) finely grated orange rind
1/2 tsp (2mL) salt
1/4 cup (50 mL) each cold butter and shortening, cubed
1 egg yolk
1 tsp (5 mL) vinegar
Ice water

FILLING:
1 can (14 oz/398 mL) pumpkin purée
1 cup (250 mL) packed brown sugar
1 pkg (4 oz/125 g) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup (125 mL) whipping cream
2 eggs
1 tbsp (15 mL) all-purpose flour
1 tsp (5 mL) each cinnamon and vanilla
1/2 tsp (2 mL) each ground ginger, nutmeg and salt

TOPPING:
1/2 cup (125 mL) whipping cream

In large bowl, combine flour, orange rind and salt. Using pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in butter and shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. In measuring cup, whisk egg yolk with vinegar; pour in enough ice water to make 1/3 cup (75 mL). Drizzle over flour mixture, tossing with fork until dough holds together and adding a little more ice water if necessary. Form into ball; press into disc. Wrap in plastic wrap; refrigerate for 1 hour.

On floured surface, roll out pastry to 1/8-inch (3 mm) thickness; fit into 9-inch (23 cm) pie plate. Trim edge to 3/4 inch (2 cm) overhang, reserving scraps; fold edge under and flute. Prick shell all over. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Line pastry shell with foil; fill evenly with pie weights or dried beans. Bake in bottom third of 375°F (190°C) oven for 15 minutes; remove weights and foil. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes longer or until pastry just starts to turn golden.

FILLING: Meanwhile, in food processor, purée together pumpkin purée, sugar, cream cheese, whipping cream, eggs, flour, cinnamon, vanilla, ginger, nutmeg and salt. Pour into pie shell; bake in bottom third of 350°F (180°C) oven for 1 hour or until set around edge and slightly jiggly in centre. Let cool on rack.

(MAKE-AHEAD: Cover and refrigerate for up to 8 hours.)

TOPPING: In bowl, whip cream. Pipe or spoon into 8 rosettes around edge. Top each with pastry pumpkin (see tip); stand 3 pumpkins in centre.

TEST KITCHEN TIP: To decorate the pie, cut out miniature pastry pumpkins and arrange on top. Gather pastry scraps together and roll out, Using small pumpkinshaped cookie cutter, cut out 12 shapes. Transfer to baking sheet; bake in bottom third of 375°F (190°C) oven for about 12 minutes or until golden. Transfer to rack; let cool.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Per serving: about 496 cal, 7 g pro, 30 g total fat , 16 g sat. fat , 51 g carb, 2 g fibre, 152 mg chol, 431 mg sodium. % RDI: calcium 8%, iron 21%, folate 19%, vit. A 128%, vit. C 5%.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Taste of Canada

Taste of Canada

A culinary journey
edition:eBook
tagged : seasonal, canadian
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Excerpt

When our children were young, we spent our family holiday in a different province each year. We would either fly and rent a car or drive there and spend days exploring as much of the province as we could. In the few weeks we had, there wasn’t time to discover every corner, but we hoped to give the children a “taste of Canada” before they set off to see the rest of the world. Similarly, this book takes you on a culinary journey across the country. In such a vast country, we won’t go down every lane or visit every kitchen, but you’ll get a glimpse of what grows in various regions and how that affects the cooking of the area. Bordered by three oceans and abundant in freshwater lakes and rivers, rich farmlands and great forests, Canada has attracted immigrants for over four centuries. A distinctive Canadian cuisine developed from interweaving the products of these fertile resources and the food traditions brought by each newcomer. In Canada, everyone has roots in some other place—even First Nations, whose forebears may have been Northeast Asian hunters who followed mastodons across the Bering land bridge or sailed along the ice-free Pacific coast. Some hypothesize the earliest arrivals were ice age Europeans (Solutreans) who sailed to eastern North America. However they came, they spread across the country and developed foods and cultures based on the natural resources: caribou hunters in the Arctic; Micmac (Mi’kmaq) fishermen on the East Coast; agricultural peoples like the Iroquois and Huron nations in parts of southern Quebec and Ontario; nomadic tribes like the Plains Cree and Assiniboine in the Prairies, who depended on bison; and on the West Coast, interior and coastal nations thriving on abundant marine life and wild plants. By the time the first Europeans arrived, they found many indigenous societies well adapted to local climates and food supplies. First Nations foods like pemmican, corn and dried salmon saved the first explorers and fur traders from starvation; later, early settlers across the country survived in part because Native people shared not only their knowledge of our natural food supplies, but also their cooking and preservation methods. Foods, depending on the area, included a wide array of fish, fowl, and mammals, saskatoon berries, blueberries, bakeapples, maple syrup, fiddleheads and wild rice. Regional cooking was born. With their contrasts in geography, climate, history and the backgrounds of people who inhabit them, today’s regions all have their own gastronomic personalities, though there are also many similarities across the country.

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Setting a Fine Table

Setting a Fine Table

Historic Desserts and Drinks from the Officers' Kitchens at Fort York
edition:Paperback
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Best Recipes of the Maritime Provinces

Best Recipes of the Maritime Provinces

The best tasting recipes from home cooks and leading chefs
selected by Elizabeth Baird
edition:Paperback
tagged : canadian
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