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Political Science Canadian

The Decline of Deference

Canadian Value Change in Cross National Perspective

by (author) Neil Nevitte

Publisher
University of Toronto Press
Initial publish date
Aug 1996
Category
Canadian, Environmental Policy, Human Rights, Civil Rights
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781551110318
    Publish Date
    Aug 1996
    List Price
    $45.95
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781442602519
    Publish Date
    Aug 1996
    List Price
    $32.95

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Description

Since the 1980s Canadians have experienced turmoil on an unprecedented scale and on a variety of fronts. Constitutional battles pitted citizen against citizen and publics against leaders. Vigorous new interest groups challenged governments to respond to new issues like the environment, gay rights, and equality for women. In the face of expanding trade relations Canadians mobilized to respond to economic uncertainty, and family relations were exposed to new stresses. What explains the turmoil?

In this extraordinarily wide-ranging book, Neil Nevitte demonstrates that the changing patterns of Canadian values are connected. Changing attitudes to authority in the family are connected to changing attitudes to the work-place and to politics and they all point to one theme—the decline of deference. Canada's turmoil is not unique, nor is it a result of the "Americanization" of Canadian values. Canada, he argues, is but one stage on which the rhythms of post-industrial value change are played out.

About the author

Neil Nevitte is Professor of Political Science and cross-appointed as Professor at the School of Public Policy and Governance and the School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

Neil Nevitte's profile page

Editorial Reviews

Presents an unexpected profile of Canadians: remarkably egalitarian in family life, increasingly difficult to govern politically and to manage in the workplace. Cosmopolitan and sophisticated, yes. But tolerant? Not really.

<i>The Globe and Mail</i>

Other titles by Neil Nevitte