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Children's Fiction Middle East

The Breadwinner (movie tie-in edition)

by (author) Deborah Ellis

Publisher
Groundwood Books Ltd
Initial publish date
Aug 2017
Category
Middle East, Girls & Women, Self-Esteem & Self-Reliance
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781773060712
    Publish Date
    Aug 2017
    List Price
    $10.99
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781554980079
    Publish Date
    Sep 2000
    List Price
    $9.95

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Where to buy it

Recommended Age, Grade, and Reading Levels

  • Age: 10 to 14
  • Grade: 5 to 9
  • Reading age: 10 to 14

Description

A special movie tie-in edition of The Breadwinner, the first book in the best-selling Breadwinner series by Deborah Ellis, featuring an eight-page color insert with stills from the movie.

Eleven-year-old Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed-out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan’s capital city. Parvana’s father — a history teacher until his school was bombed and his health destroyed — works from a blanket on the ground in the marketplace, reading letters for people who cannot read or write. One day, he is arrested for the crime of having a foreign education, and the family is left without someone who can earn money or even shop for food.

As conditions for the family grow desperate, only one solution emerges. Forbidden to earn money as a girl, Parvana must transform herself into a boy, and become the breadwinner.

The book includes a map, author’s note and a glossary to provide young readers with background and context. An eight-page color insert features stills from the movie. All royalties from the sale of this book will go to Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan. Parvana’s Fund supports education projects for Afghan women and children.

Key Text Features
map
author’s note
foreword
glossary

Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.3
Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.3
Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

About the author

Deborah Ellis is the internationally acclaimed author of more than twenty books for children, including The Breadwinner Trilogy; The Heaven Shop; Lunch With Lenin; Children of War: Voices of Iraqi Refugees; and Our Stories, Our Songs: African Children Talk About AIDS. She has won many national and international awards for her books, including the Governor General’s Award, the Vicky Metcalf Award, Sweden’s Peter Pan Prize, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award, and the Children’s Africana Book Award Honor Book for Older Readers.Deborah knew she wanted to be a writer at the age of 11 or 12. Growing up in Paris, Ontario, she loved reading about big cities like New York. In high school, Deborah joined the Peace Movement, playing anti-Nuclear War movies at her school. Since then Deborah has become a peace activist, humanitarian and philanthropist, donating almost all of the royalties from her books to communities in need in Asia and Africa. Heavily involved with Women for Women in Afghanistan, Deborah has helped build women’s centers and schools, giving children education and finding work for women.In 2006, Deborah was named to the Order of Ontario. She now lives in Simcoe, Ontario.

Deborah Ellis' profile page

Awards

  • Winner, Rebecca Caudill Young Readers' Award
  • Long-listed, Young Jury Awards
  • Winner, Hackmatack Children's Choice Book Award
  • Winner, Sweden's Peter Pan Prize
  • Commended, Rebecca Caudill Young Readers' Award
  • Commended, YALSA PPYA
  • Long-listed, SYRCA Diamond Willow Award
  • Winner, Baia delle Favole Prize
  • Winner, Middle East Book Award
  • Short-listed, Trillium Book Award
  • Long-listed, Red Maple Award

Excerpt: The Breadwinner (movie tie-in edition) (by (author) Deborah Ellis)

Parvana felt the shadow before she saw it, as the man moved between her and the sun. Turning her head, she saw the dark turban that was the uniform of the Taliban. A rifle was slung across his chest as casually as her father’s shoulder bag had been slung across hers.…

The Talib kept looking down at her. Then he put his hand inside his vest. Keeping his eyes on Parvana, he drew something out of his vest pocket.

Parvana was about to squish her eyes shut and wait to be shot when she saw that the Talib had taken out a letter.

He sat down beside her on the blanket.

“Read this,” he said.

Other titles by Deborah Ellis