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category: Fiction
published: Feb 2001
ISBN:9780679310945
imprint: Vintage Canada

Dressing Up for the Carnival

by Carol Shields

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short stories (single author)
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $17.95
edition:Paperback
also available: Audiobook (cassette)
category: Fiction
published: Feb 2001
ISBN:9780679310945
imprint: Vintage Canada
Description

From one of Canada's best-loved, award-winning authors comes a surprising treasure trove: Carol Shields distilling her wisdom, elegance, insouciant sense of humour and eroticism into twenty-two delightful stories. The title story sets the stage: a Shakespearean prologue in which the narrative flame jumps from character to character, each of them dressed up and putting their best foot forward, conscious of costuming themselves for the daily carnival of life. Playful, graceful, acutely observed and generous of spirit, these stories are Carol Shields at her most accomplished and appealing.

Contributor Notes

Born in Oak Park, Illinois, in 1935, Carol Shields moved to Canada at the age of twenty-two, after studying at the University of Exeter in England, and then obtained her M.A. at the University of Ottawa. She started publishing poetry in her thirties, and wrote her first novel, Small Ceremonies, in 1976. Over the next three decades, Shields would become the author of over twenty books, including plays, poetry, essays, short fiction, novels, a book of criticism on Susanna Moodie and a biography of Jane Austen. Her work has been translated into twenty-two languages.

In addition to her writing, Carol Shields worked as an academic, teaching at the University of Ottawa, the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba. In 1996, she became chancellor of the University of Winnipeg. She lived for fifteen years in Winnipeg and often used it as a backdrop to her fiction, perhaps most notably in Republic of Love. Shields also raised five children — a son and four daughters — with her husband Don, and often spoke of juggling early motherhood with her nascent writing career. When asked in one interview whether being a mother changed her as a writer, she replied, “Oh, completely. I couldn’t have been a novelist without being a mother. It gives you a unique witness point of the growth of personality. It was a kind of biological component for me that had to come first. And my children give me this other window on the world.”

The Stone Diaries, her fictional biography of Daisy Goodwill, a woman who drifts through her life as child, wife, mother and widow, bewildered by her inability to understand any of these roles, received excellent reviews. The book won a Governor General’s Literary Award and a Pulitzer Prize, and was also shortlisted for the Booker Prize, bringing Shields an international following. Her novel Swann was made into a film (1996), as was The Republic of Love (2003; directed by Deepa Mehta). Larry’s Party, published in several countries and adapted into a musical stage play, won England’s Orange Prize, given to the best book by a woman writer in the English-speaking world. And Shields’s final novel, Unless, was shortlisted for the Booker, Orange and Giller prizes and the Governor General’s Literary Award, and won the Ethel Wilson Prize for Fiction.

Shields’s novels are shrewdly observed portrayals of everyday life. Reviewers praised her for exploring such universal themes as loneliness and lost opportunities, though she also celebrated the beauty and small rewards that are so often central to our happiness yet missing from our fiction. In an eloquent afterword to Dropped Threads, Shields says her own experience taught her that life is not a mountain to be climbed, but more like a novel with a series of chapters.

Carol Shields was always passionate about biography, both in her writing and her reading, and in 2001 she published a biography of Jane Austen. For Shields, Austen was among the greatest of novelists and served as a model: “Jane Austen has figured out the strategies of fiction for us and made them plain.” In 2002, Jane Austen won the coveted Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-fiction. A similar biographical impulse lay behind the two Dropped Threads anthologies Carol Shields edited with Marjorie Anderson; their contributors were encouraged to write about those experiences that women are normally not able to talk about. “Our feeling was that women are so busy protecting themselves and other people that they still feel they have to keep quiet about some subjects,” Shields explained in an interview.

Shields spoke often of redeeming the lives of people by recording them in her own works, “especially that group of women who came between the two great women's movements…. I think those women’s lives were often thought of as worthless because they only kept house and played bridge. But I think they had value.”

In 1998, Shields was diagnosed with breast cancer. Speaking on her illness, Shields once said, “It’s made me value time in a way that I suppose I hadn’t before. I’m spending my time listening, listening to what's going around, what's happening around me instead of trying to get it all down.” In 2000, Shields and her husband Don moved from Winnipeg to Victoria, where they lived until her passing on July 16, 2003, from complications of breast cancer, at age 68.

Editorial Review

"A radiant gift, a brilliant archive, a book of common prayer for those who appreciate the transcendence of all that is prosaic...this latest clutch of stories is rich with a poetic intensity seldom present in contemporary fiction today. Dressing Up for the Carnival is a book to be savoured, the kind of book a dedicated reader will place gently on the bedside table, doling out one story each night to make the book last longer." —Winnipeg Free Press

"Here's Shields doing what she does so marvellously: taking an ordinary, over-looked object and re-illuminating it, offering us a chance to meditate on ignored corners or fragments of our own lives.... There's much intelligence here and a singular inventiveness enlivened by odd passions and deft humour...dazzling and wickedly funny." —The Globe and Mail

"Dressing up for the Carnival is a taste of something different from Shields. It is a gourmand's delight with each tale centered around one stabilizing theme: life is a carnival.... The tenderness of Shields' narration is her trademark. Her gift of narrowing the telescope and uncoiling the springs of private thoughts — those that blow past in seconds — is her particular genius." —New Brunswick Telegraph

"Shields is an alchemist who can somehow produce gold from the mundane.... Every story in this collection is a small, glittering masterpiece." —National Post

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Reader Reviews

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Dressing up Review

just finished reading Pulitzer Prize Winner Carol Shield’s collection of short stories. I have enjoyed her work in the past, her novels, especially “Larry’s Party.”
One thing I will say about “Dressing up for the Carnival” is that I was continually surprised. Shields is a writer who changes from my viewpoint to the next with ease, someone who can seemingly be behind anyone’s eyes and you would except her to be there. The stories range from a meek writer who wants to find the perfect scarf for her daughter to a grandfather who started a nudist camp. The objects in her story are brought to life and we can see how objects can hold such deep meaning.
My favourite story was ” Invention” a sweet and amusing tale of all the people in a family who had invented things. As a grammar nerd I was so intrigued to see the stories behind the semi colon and the hyphen, so amusing the think of people actually inventing these things, before realizing that, why yes, someone had to invent them after all.
I like the reality of the stories. They almost felt gritty.
All in all it was an easy read, a great collection and continually changing. However, as I usually find with most shorts, the stories and characters just did not stay with me.
3.5/5 stars.

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