Emotions

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Small Town Divorce

Small Town Divorce

A Road Map Through Devastation, Despair, and Drama
edition:Paperback
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Unchained

Unchained

A Journey to the Soul from Head to Heart
edition:Paperback
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A User’s Guide to the Human Body
Excerpt

FOREWORD

Life, let alone medicine, healthcare and well-being, is changing. Individuals in every civilization from ancient to modern have understood the Earth’s ability to provide the necessities of life and humans’ innate ability to heal from illness or injury, but it feels like the march of progress now is very different compared to other times and places. Nonetheless, the ways in which we humans feel about and respond to change remains remarkably consistent. One common theme is that – whether or not we recognize it in ourselves – we seek out and search for an effective, meaningful and fulfilling understanding of the world, of the new and the old. Yet so often the answers we seek are right there in front of or within us.

The discoveries in medicine over the last 100 years or so have been breathtaking. From the advent of Germ Theory and the antibiotic era onwards, we’ve benefited from treatments borne out of ever increasing knowledge. Alongside the well-established scientific and technological development, I think there’s been a deeper change that’s a genuinely “new thing” – well at least new in the modern age. That change is the de-paternalisation of medicine in which we’ve seen the balance of authority move from “You suffer disease and you shall receive this treatment” to “Here’s the options, how do you want to treat this condition that’s affecting you?” The patient is now encouraged, expected to be an active participant in their healthcare decisions rather than being told what has to be done.

The same shift is seen across many areas of life and I believe the biggest factors contributing to it are the ease of access to the large body of information people now have on almost any subject and the ease of access to the tools and resources of specialisation that were only available to the privileged chosen few. Across almost every human endeavour we see personalisation and customisation replacing pre-set, one-size-fits-all approaches.

So alongside the progress of science, technology and treatment there’s more personalised medicine, choice and patient autonomy. We see conventional medicine being asked questions it wasn’t ever designed to answer and so we see ourselves turned towards “unconventional” approaches to find answers to the questions that people ask about themselves and their well-being. In this setting we can see the importance of complementary or alternative therapies, ancient and modern approaches combining to give patients the best outcome possible.

Shane’s book serves to remind us that along with great choice comes great responsibility and ultimately, we’re each responsible for our own health and have the power to change our circumstances. It provides a clear explanation of a connection between body and mind from a newer and more in-depth understanding of the fascial system and suggests some simple tools and techniques people can use to begin to regain control of their health. Along the way she introduces important diet, exercise, lifestyle and environmental factors that affect us all and have to be considered if we want to improve our sense of well-being.

Dr. Atul Kumar-Beurg London, UK

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A Life Full of Glitter

A Life Full of Glitter

A Guide to Positive Thinking, Self-Acceptance, and Finding Your Sparkle in a (Sometimes) Negative World
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

Positive Thinkers Cope Better With Stress When I was younger whenever I would get a message that I needed to meet with a teacher or boss, I would spend the rest of the day engulfed in worry. Bullets of sweat would run from my forehead. My palms would get sweaty. I was certain I had done something wrong. How could I do anything right? I worry that entire day about what that ominous meeting could be about. Maybe I failed. Maybe they were mad. Maybe somebody has said something terrible about me and I was going to have defend myself. I would spend every hour until the meeting running over every potential negative reason and every catastrophic potential outcome. By the time the sit down was scheduled, I would have to drag my anxiety ridden, stress ball self into the room only to find out I just forgot to submit some paperwork or some other mundane thing. All my fears. All my anxiety. They were pointless. The stress I carried with me through everything I did that day was unnecessary. A huge amount of my precious emotional energy was like a kid on the night of their twenty-first first birthday—wasted. Most of our day to day stress—just like mine in this example—is self-created. When research stress I was surprised to find that stress itself doesn’t exist in an event, but rather in our perception of an event. In simple terms it means no matter what happens in life, you have the ability to be in the emotional driver’s seat. Pessimists (aka my previous self) approach common-place life situations with the expectation they’ve done something wrong. In the previous example, I used to assume that the only reason a boss or teacher might ever speak to me is because I had done something wrong. This type of thinking created additional heartache for me. It also closed me off from opportunities, friendships because I assumed that people were entering interactions with me only for negative reasons. This also affected my ability to manage my stress in the long term. Optimists on the other hand (aka present day moi) don’t apply a sentiment to a situation until all the facts needed to fairly assess it are available. It’s not that I’m assuming in the same situation that something amazing is going to happen. I’m not sitting anxiously, counting down the hours until my next office pow-wow so I can get some super fun prize. I’ve simply stopped assuming anything at all. If the event is negative, I benefit from the fact I haven’t been mulling over it, dissecting the situation and creating a million and one negative outcomes in my head. As a result, I am more prepared to manage the real results of the situation. I’m also less likely to overreact as result of all my extra ( and unnecessary) pent up emotion. I am more able to resolve whatever issues, if any, that result. I should share that this has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to learn. In the early stages of my career when a problem would arise, I would have to tell no less than every single person in my office, the door man, and several strangers I wrassled into conversation on the street before I could put the issue to rest. Sometimes even that wasn’t enough. I’d find myself like a car caught in quicksand—spinning my wheels with all this excess emotion and getting nowhere. Venting our issues, while seemingly harmless and perhaps even possibly therapeutic, can cause us to fixate on a negative incident rather than invest our energy in resolution. This story always serves to remind me that I have a choice in where I invest my energy. Most of the stress in my day to day life can be avoided or even reduced by keeping an upbeat attitude. Research has found that optimists not only create less stressful situations, but also experience stress less overall than others. As a new found optimist I find I tend to let go of negative events more quickly. This keeps stressful situations from piling up and becoming overwhelming. I’ve also been able to build better support systems, because I’ve stopped assuming the worst of every situation I enter. When stressful situations arise, Im able to reach out to my friends and rely on them to help me through. In short choosing to see the good in things the has resulted me having better relationships, less stress, and helped me let go of some of my baggage. I think we can all agree that the world could use a few more people that leave the baggage at home.

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