About the Author

Lorene Shyba

Books by this Author
RumbleSat Art from the Edge of Space
Excerpt

Excerpt form "Not Alone" a short story by Jim Parker. Only a few years earlier, they would have missed the object entirely. The astronomers at the Poem Tree Observatory had improved their small object detection system in the past few years, their ‘meteor shield,’ as people called it. The approaching object was at the limit of their abilities, moving rapidly through their solar system faster than a comet. It was not in orbit of the sun, so had come from outside the system. That fact alone made it worthy of interest, but the object also appeared to be slowing; interesting too, because only artificial objects do that. Jonos left the observatory at sunset. Many of the astronomers worked at night, or course, but Jonos was tracking local objects, and especially this object, with radar, and it was now below the horizon. Nothing more to be done tonight, as the object posed no danger. He took the tram down the hill to the elevator where his colleague Kip was waiting at the bottom. “Well, if it isn’t the famous discoverer of the extra-solar object!” Kip shouted. Their meeting was not planned, and in fact Jonos didn’t like Kip much. She was something of a motor mouth. However, Kip was on the committee that assigned radio telescope time, and Jonos knew that it behooved him to be nice around her. “Well, hello. I didn’t expect to see you today. How are things in the high pay levels?” Jonos asked. “I am perfect,” Kip replied, slapping Jonos on the shoulder. “You know, you have made my job so much more interesting. The sun was just touching the horizon. The sky was red, the clouds were orange and yellow, and the wind was rising, as it always did at sunset. The poem trees were singing a lullaby, and they smelled glorious. It was Jonos’ favourite time of day. He did not want it ruined by a chance encounter with someone he found as irritating as Kip. He sighed to himself. Kip continued, “We’re having some press here tomorrow. I hope you can spare them some time. They have questions, and I know that you don’t have all of the answers, but you’re now the expert. They need to hear from you.” “Sure, you know me. Always willing to help.” Jonos sighed again. “Listen, make it early in the morning so that I can get it out of the way before I start working.” He smiled weakly. “It would help. I’m not getting much sleep.”

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5000 Dead Ducks

5000 Dead Ducks

Lust and Revolution in the Oilsands
edition:Paperback
tagged : satire
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Excerpt

At the moment, George Bovich is more interested in his bologna sandwich than in the workings of his portable mini-power reactor. He and his buddies call these rolling reactors ‘mobile nukes’. There are a bunch of them perched like locusts on the banks of the Athabauna River, superheating the water that separates the oil from the sands. George glances at the master dial. The needle is bouncing back and forth into the red. He puts down his sandwich. Strange, he thinks. He rummages around for the manual. It’s all in FarEast, so it’s not much help. “Hey Chip, we got a manual in English?” Chip crawls out from the back of the truck. “Not that I know of.” Pulling his goggles down, he wipes his streaming brow under his hardhat, “Shit, it’s awful hot back there all of a sudden.” George radios over to his buddy on the opposite bank. “Hey Charlie, your dials acting up?” “Yeah, hey, main dial’s stuck in the red. Maybe we should call the high-tech guy at the plant. Truck’s startin’ to shake too.” Bovich looks again at his dial. “Mine’s maxed too. And the truck’s shakin’ like an SOB. Holy sh**.”

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Do or Die Filmmaking

Do or Die Filmmaking

From the School of Hard Knocks
edition:Paperback
also available: Paperback
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More Tough Crimes
Excerpt

Foreword by Honourable Patrick LeSage “I have seen the effect of crime on many parts of the community; first and foremost the victims of crime and their families, but also police officers, medics, witnesses, court staff, the lawyers, the jurors and the judges and yes, even the families of the perpetrators. I have spoken to judges who previously unbeknownst to me had suffered deeply from the effects of a case or cases, be it the trauma flowing from the details of the crime, to the impact of having to view child pornography, to living in a smaller community where lawyers, judges and police find themselves always in the public eye, even outside the courtroom.”

PART I: Politics and Transborder Donald Bayne. “Mike Duffy: Trial By Media in a Post-Truth World.” “Moments before he went on television, Senator Duffy pleaded with PMO insider and confidante to the Prime Minister, Ray Novak, saying, ‘Ray, I did nothing wrong. If I take a dive for my leader when I am innocent, then I am totally at the mercy of the opposition.’ This plea fell on deaf PMO ears and insiders emailed one another with notes like, ‘I appreciate the work this team did on this. One down, two to go (and one out)’; ‘Yay this is fun’; and ‘Sweet’.”

Brian H. Greenspan. “The Eagle Has Landed: The Eagleson Transborder Resolution” “The public fervour against Alan Eagleson led by Russ Conway and his cadre of supporters, most vociferously Carl Brewer and Bobby Orr, had always been offset by a subdued and more private list of Eagleson loyalists and admirers including Bob Gainey, Bobby Clarke, Marcel Dionne, as well as a distinguished group of former politicians and judges. I had always felt confident that my list of All-Stars would eventually outperform and outlast their All-Stars. Following the announcement of the Canadian charges, Paul Kelly was inundated with demands for speedy justice. At the same time I was bombarded with protestations of Alan’s innocence and demands for his ultimate vindication.”

David Bright QC. “Justice Delayed: A Story of Complacency” “When MacIntosh was taken before the presiding Justice in India, he indicated that he was not contesting his return to Canada, but needed time to wind up his affairs. He had been living in India for many years and had a household of furnishings that required disposal, as well a duty to his employer to turn over the office to a successor. Indeed he was given time, but he was accompanied everywhere by armed Indian police. During the nights and non-business times, he was housed in the infamous Tihar Jail, which is a vast penal colony in Delhi. It is equipped to handle some 5,200 prisoners, however, at the time of MacIntosh’s incarceration, some 10,500 were housed there. Conditions were abhorrent. MacIntosh slept and sat on a wet, concrete floor, with a variety of other prisoners incarcerated for serious crimes. He had to purchase his own food. The so-called dormitory area was visited by rodents and vermin, and snakes were a common sight.”

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Tough Crimes
Excerpt

John Rosen on Defence of Paul Bernardo “Much has been written about the videotapes, the failure of the police to find them and the horrific nature of their contents. But nothing has ever been said about the impact of the tapes on the lawyers. After taking possession of the tapes, [Clayton] Ruby and I met at his home to view them for the first time. We played the VHS tapes so as not to damage the originals. We also fast-forwarded through most parts. Our intention was to get an understanding of what was depicted so we could assess my legal, professional and ethical obligations. “In truth though, the images depicted shook me to the core. At one point, I needed to stop and excuse myself for a few moments. The images were deeply disturbing and the implications were obvious. How was I going to defend this case in the face of these tapes? What would prevent the jury from coming over the boards at me for having the gall to advance any defence for this accused? Moreover, I am a father myself – what would my own family think of me? How was I going to survive a trial with my health and reputation intact? “I could have avoided my responsibilities by claiming I was a witness to the chain of custody of the tapes. But what would that have said about the twenty-five years of my life that, at that point in time, I had dedicated to the criminal law? After a moment’s hesitation, I decided to set aside my personal feelings and interests and get on with the job at hand.”

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