About the Author

Anne Renaud

Anne Renaud is a life-long Quebecker and is the author of several picture books, as well as historical non-fiction books for children, including: The Extraordinary Life of Anna Swan (CBU Press), A Bloom of Friendship: The Story of the Canadian Tulip Festival, Island of Hope and Sorrow: The Story of Grosse Île, and Into the Mist: The Story of the Empress of Ireland. An expanded edition of Pier 21: Stories from Near and Far, first published in 2008, is forthcoming from CBU Press. Anne’s work has been nominated for several awards, including the Silver Birch Award, the Hackmatack Children’s Choice Award, the Red Cedar Book Award and the Red Maple Award. The Extraordinary Life of Anna Swan ( for CBU Press, 2013) was shortlistedthe Quebec Writers’ Federation Prize for Children's & Young Adult Literature. Anne is also a regular contributor to children’s magazines, such as Highlights, Pockets, Cricket, Odyssey, Faces, Clubhouse and Shine. She hopes her books educate, entertain and inspire children.

Books by this Author
Anna Swan

Anna Swan

La vraie histoire d'une géante
by Anne Renaud
illustrated by Marie Lafrance
edition:Paperback
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Boy Who Invented the Popsicle, The

Boy Who Invented the Popsicle, The

The Cool Science Behind Frank Epperson's Famous Frozen Treat
by Anne Renaud
illustrated by Milan Pavlovic
edition:Hardcover
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Into the Mist

Into the Mist

The Story of the Empress of Ireland
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Pier 21

Pier 21

Stories from Near and Far
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

As Hitler's war machine advanced across Europe, Great Britain soon realised it too might be invaded. In the summer of 1940, German bombs fell on London. At night, the air raid sirens wailed and people scrambled into bomb shelters. Fearful for their children, many British families decided to send them to other countries for safekeeping. These countries included the United States, Australia, South Africa, and Canada. Many children were sent to Canada through a program funded by the British government called the Children's Overseas Reception Board. From all over Great Britain, children travelled to Liverpool, England, and Glasgow, Scotland, to board ships bound for Canada. The children were allowed to take whatever could fit into one suitcase, and wore name labels pinned to their jackets and sweaters for identification.

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