About the Author

Stacey May Fowles

Stacey May Fowles is a writer and McGill Graduate in English Literature and Womenâ??s Studies who has worked in the literary and gallery communities of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. Her written work has been published in various digital and literary publications, including Fireweed, The Absinthe Literary Review, Kiss Machine, subTERRAIN, Lickety Split and Hive Magazine.  Her non-fiction piece Friction Burn appeared in the widely acclaimed anthology Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity (ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore, Seal Press.) She has work forthcoming in the anthology Transits: Stories from In-between (Invisible Publishing) and Cahoots magazine. She is a recent recipient of both the Toronto Arts Council, Ontario Arts Council and Canada Council for the Arts grants for works in progress and her first novel, Be Good, is forthcoming with Tightrope Books in fall 2007. She is currently working her second novel, every other love that is happening to you right now is not this big and Unconvincing, a collection of short stories.  

Books by this Author
Baseball Life Advice

Baseball Life Advice

Loving the Game That Saved Me
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

From Baseball Life Advice

On not being encouraged to be a baseball fan:

"Baseball is one of those things I was never told I should love. No one passed it down to me like some sacred family heirloom — I chose it for myself. Throughout my life I’ve been told I should love certain books and films, certain bands and fashions. I’ve struggled to love the jobs I did, the men I dated, family members who were less than lovable. But unlike most people and things, baseball never asked anything of me, and no one ever demanded I be loyal to it. I never played it, my parents didn’t strong-arm me into attending games, and I didn’t have a social group that insisted it become an integral part of my life. In fact, I would say that I was consistently discouraged from loving this pastime and culture built for men and boys, fathers and sons, that’s not always welcoming of my gender. There is no real template for loving baseball when you’re a girl or a woman, so you have to fumble around a bit to make it your own. I like to think I truly love the game because it made itself hard to love and I embraced it anyway. Because of that, it belongs to me in a way nothing else does."

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Fear of Fighting

Fear of Fighting

edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
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Excerpt

Fear of Fighting, Stacey May Fowles’ second novel, is as gut-wrenching as it is delightful. Fowles navigates the devastating terrain of a broken heart with grace, humour, and wit.The novel’s protagonist, a diffident Torontonian in her late twenties named Marnie, is a cutter and a hypochondriac, and possibly an alcoholic. She works a drab job, shredding the personal files of people she’s never met and never will. In the aftermath of a romantic break-up, she avoids friends, responsibility, and personal hygiene, and keeps lists of the diseases she probably has, or is about to get. Marnie’s gritty, unabashedly candid first-person narration weaves between past and present. The chapters are brief, and many of them have sufficient substance to stand alone, which is one of the novel’s best features. Marnie’s next-door neighbour drops in with self-help books that Marnie doesn’t read, but their relationship is never fully explored and it is not entirely clear what his role in the narrative is.Fear of Fighting is not plot-driven. It doesn’t wrap up neatly, and a knight in shining armour doesn’t appear to heal Marnie’s broken heart. Instead, it is a collection of insignificant moments that, when placed next to one another, are infused with meaning.Fowles’ protagonist is sometimes excessively indulgent about her own troubles, and therefore not entirely likable, but many readers will find her embarrassingly recognizable. We have all wallowed in self-pity following the failure of a relationship, and Fowles captures those months of obsession and regret with power and insight. Marlena Zuber’s incidetal illustrations are not essential to the book, as they would be in, say, a graphic novel, but they are very charming, nonetheless.

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Infidelity

Infidelity

A Novel
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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She's Shameless

She's Shameless

Women write about growing up, rocking out and fighting back
edition:Paperback
tagged : adolescence
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