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Fiction Cultural Heritage

You are Eating an Orange. You are Naked.

by (author) Sheung-King Sheung-King

Publisher
Book*hug Press
Initial publish date
Oct 2020
Category
Cultural Heritage, Literary, Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781771666428
    Publish Date
    Oct 2020
    List Price
    $22.99

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Description

A young translator travels from his home in Toronto to Hong Kong, Macau, Prague, Tokyo. His unnamed lover comes with him: in restaurants and hotel rooms, they entertain each other with comic and enigmatic folk tales. Yet their verbal play and philosophical questions mask the fragility of their own relationship, which is made still more tenuous by he woman's unexplained disappearances.

You Are Eating an Orange. You Are Naked. is an intimate novel of memory and longing that challenges Western tropes and Orientalism. Embracing the playful surrealism of Haruki Murakami and the atmospheric narratives of filmmaker Wong Kar-wai, Sheung-King's debut is at once lyrical and punctuated, and wholly unique, and marks the arrival of a bold new voice in Canadian literature.

About the author

Sheung-King is a writer and educator. His work has appeared in PRISM International, The Shanghai Literary Review, and The Humber Literary Review, among others. He is currently a lecturer at the University of Guelph and Sheridan College. You Are Eating an Orange. You Are Naked. is Sheung-King's debut book. Originally from Hong Kong, he lives in Toronto.

Sheung-King Sheung-King's profile page

Editorial Reviews

Praise for You Are Eating an Orange. You Are Naked.:

"Sheung-King has written a wonderfully unexpected and maverick love story but also a novel of ideas that hopscotches between Toronto, Macau, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Prague. It is enchanting, funny, and a joy to read." —Kyo Maclear, author of Birds Art Life

"A tale that oozos the horror and confusion of love, while staying somehow still desperately romantic. It gives the cold shoulder to the dominant gaze and its demands to control the Asian body, carving out a thrilling space beyond whiteness. I didn't want it to end." —Thea Lim, author of An Ocean of Minutes, a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize

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