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Literary Criticism Ancient & Classical

The Poem of Empedocles

A text and translation with a commentary

edited by Brad Inwood

Publisher
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division
Initial publish date
Jan 2001
Category
Ancient & Classical, Ancient & Classical
  • Hardback

    ISBN
    9780802059710
    Publish Date
    May 1991
    List Price
    $58.00
  • Hardback

    ISBN
    9780802048202
    Publish Date
    Jan 2001
    List Price
    $99.00
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9780802083531
    Publish Date
    Jan 2001
    List Price
    $52.00
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781442682047
    Publish Date
    Apr 2001
    List Price
    $121.00

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Out of print

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Description

This revised edition of The Poem of Empedocles (1992) integrates substantial new material from a recently discovered papyrus and published by A. Martin and O. Primavesi. The papyrus contains evidence of over seventy lines or part lines of poetry, of which more than fifty are both new and usable. The integration of this material into the previously known fragments has significant impact on our understanding of Empedocles, one of the most influential philosophers and poets of antiquity.

This volume provides the reader with the fullest and most accessible set of evidence for the doctrines and poetic achievement of this Presocratic philosopher. The Greek text of the fragments (with English facing page translation) has been revised to include the new material; textual notes have also been enhanced. The revised introduction orients the reader to the study of Empedocles and assesses the significance of the new material. The new papyrus fragments shed some light on the controversial question of the number of poems and provide new insight into the relationship between human beings and the material components we are composed of and into the reasons for our incarnation. Most important, the new fragments yield further confirmation that eschatological and cosmological themes were inextricably interconnected in Empedocles' philosophical poetry.

About the author

Brad Inwood is Professor of Classics, University of Toronto.

Brad Inwood's profile page

Other titles by Brad Inwood