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list price: $14.95
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback Hardcover
published: July 2009
ISBN:9781926685762
publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

One Native Life

by Richard Wagamese

reviews: 3
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native americans, native american studies
5 of 5
1 rating
rated!
rated!
list price: $14.95
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback Hardcover
published: July 2009
ISBN:9781926685762
publisher: Douglas & McIntyre
Description

In 2005, award-winning writer Richard Wagamese moved with his partner to a cabin outside Kamloops, B.C. In the crisp mountain air Wagamese felt a peace heíd seldom known before. Abused and abandoned as a kid, heíd grown up feeling there was nowhere he belonged. For years, only alcohol and moves from town to town seemed to ease the pain.

In One Native Life, Wagamese looks back down the road he has travelled in reclaiming his identity and talks about the things he has learned as a human being, a man and an Ojibway in his fifty-two years. Whether heís writing about playing baseball, running away with the circus, attending a sacred bundle ceremony or meeting Pierre Trudeau, he tells these stories in a healing spirit. Through them, Wagamese celebrates the learning journey his life has been.

Free of rhetoric and anger despite the horrors he has faced, Wagameseís prose resonates with a peace that has come from acceptance. Acceptance is an Aboriginal principle, and he has come to see that we are all neighbours here. One Native Life is his tribute to the people, the places and the events that have allowed him to stand in the sunshine and celebrate being alive.

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Association of Book Publishers of BC
Librarian review

One Native Life

This is a compilation of essays and reflections on how writer Richard Wagamese discovered his roots and his purpose. Taken by the government from his family as a very young child in the “Sixies Sweep”, he felt displaced and isolated as he was sent to live with a series of white families. After running away at age sixteen, he experienced homelessness, low income jobs and a transient lifestyle. Thanks to the praise and encouragement of two teachers, he held onto his dream of becoming a writer. He eventually got his first writing job as a newspaper editor, spending days in the library studying books on journalism and writing.

Wagamese is the author of the bestselling and award-winning Keeper’n Me. He became the first Aboriginal Canadian to win the National Newspaper Award for Column Writing. He received the Canadian Author’s Association Award for Fiction for 2007.

Source: The Association of Book Publishers of BC. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools. 2009-2010.

Association of Book Publishers of BC
Librarian review

Klee Wyck

This edition restores the original full text of Emily Carr’s classic text and the 1951 foreword by Ira Dilworth. It is a collection of Carr’s stories and impressions of the lives of BC’s First Nations people from her time travelling and living with them as she painted their villages and totem poles. The writing provides a vivid portrait of the people, as well as her negative views of how they were treated by the missionaries. Editions available since 1951 were based on an expurgated educational edition that had been edited to remove any possible ‘objectionable content’. Included is a new introduction by Kathryn Bridge that gives context to the writing through information about Carr and the expurgating of previous editions.

Carr is one of BC’s most wellknown artists and writers.

Caution: Contains some stereotyping language and depictions of First Nations people that could be considered racist.

Source: The Association of Book Publishers of BC. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools. 2009-2010.

Association of Book Publishers of BC
Librarian review

One Native Life

This is a collection of autobiographical short stories and vignettes from the life of the author, Richard Wagamese. He tells stories of events large and small in his life that have contributed to who he is today. These include stories about his foster families and adoptive family, his experiences as the only Aboriginal student in his schools, his reconnection with his Ojibway birth family, and stories of his time homeless and living in poverty. Most of the stories are only a few pages long, and there is a current of humour running throughout the book, even though there are stories of hard times and bad things happening.

Most of the stories in this book have previously been published in newspapers and magazines or broadcast on the radio.

Source: The Association of Book Publishers of BC. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools. 2008-2009.

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