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Drama Canadian

Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing

by (author) Tomson Highway

Publisher
Fifth House Books
Initial publish date
Oct 1989
Category
Canadian
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781897252833
    Publish Date
    Dec 2010
    List Price
    $12.95
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9780920079553
    Publish Date
    Oct 1989
    List Price
    $12.95

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Where to buy it

Recommended Age, Grade, and Reading Levels

  • Age: 16
  • Grade: 11

Description

Nominee, Governor General's Literary Award for DramaDry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing tells another story of the mythical Wasaychigan Hill Indian Reserve, also the setting for Tomson Highway's award winning play The Rez Sisters. Wherein The Rez Sisters the focus was on seven "Wasy" women and the game of bingo, Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing features seven "Wasy" men and the game of hockey. It is a fast-paced story of tragedy, comedy, and hope.

About the author

Tomson Highway
Tomson Highway was born near Maria Lake, Manitoba in 1951. Living a nomadic lifestyle with no access to books, television or radio, Highway’s parents would tell their children stories, kindling Highway’s life-long interest in the oral tradition of storytelling.

Tomson Highway is widely recognized for his tremendous contribution to the development of Aboriginal theatre in both Canada and around the world.

In 1994, he was inducted into the Order of Canada, the first Aboriginal writer to be so honoured.

Tomson Highway's profile page

Librarian Reviews

Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing

This powerful and complex play focuses on the lives of seven “Wasy” men living on the Wasaychiga Hill Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island, and the game of hockey.We watch these men cope with their reality in a dominant white society. The playwright candidly presents some of the serious social issues facing Aboriginal communities: alcoholism, fetal alcohol syndrome and a sense of identity. Life often seems futile for them but through their bond of friendship and their ability to find humour in their daily lives, they prove resilient even in the face of tragedy. Cree and Ojibwy are used throughout.

This play won the Dora Mavor Moore Award for Best New Play and was nominated for the Governor General’s Literary Award.

Caution: Contains coarse language and accounts of violence against women.

Source: The Association of Book Publishers of BC. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools. 2008-2009.

Other titles by Tomson Highway

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