The Chat

With Trevor Corkum

The Chat with Moez Surani

tagged : The Chat, poetry

Moez Surani_Author Photo_Used with permission by Moez Surani

Moez Surani’s fourth book, Are the Rivers in Your Poems Real, is out now with Book*hug Press. It’s a collection of playful, political, urgent poems that ask us to reconsider our relationship to poetry and meaning.

“There’s an urgency and immediacy to Moez Surani’s fourth collection of poems, in which he grapples with the relationship of poetry and its abstractions to reality."—Toronto Star

“[The collection] offers a mixture of poetic styles and approaches in affecting, thoughtful poems that work hard to interrogate themselves even as they interrogate you.”—Winnipeg Free Press

Moez Surani’s writing has been published internationally, including in Harper’s Magazine, The Awl, Best American Experimental Writing 2016, Best Canadian Poetry (2013 and 2014), and the Globe and Mail. He has received a Chalmers Arts Fellowship, which supported research in India and East Africa, and has been an Artist in Residence in Burma, Finland, Italy, Latvia, Taiwan, Switze …

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