About the Author

Amy Rosen

Amy Rosen covers everything from travel to bioterrorism for publications such as enRoute magazine and The Globe and Mail. She has won numerous writing awards including a 2003 award of excellence from the North American Travel Journalists Association. This is her third book and she honestly hopes you use it in good health.

Books by this Author
Dinner in 30

Dinner in 30

189 Fast Fresh Recipes
edition:eBook
tagged : quick & easy
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Kosher Style

Kosher Style

Over 100 Jewish Recipes for the Modern Cook
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

From the Introduction
Kosher Style is for those who love delicious modern food, travel writing or both. It’s a cookbook with food writing that respects the traditions born in eastern European kitchens, while traveling beyond. Jewish readers will love it for the taste memories they can recreate, while others will be won over by the gorgeous full-color photography.

So why is it called Kosher Style? Excellent question. While dozens of countries host at least a small Jewish population, the global community is concentrated in two areas. Israel and the United States account for 83 percent of the global Jewish population, with about seven million in each. Canada is home to about 500,000 Jews. A chunk of this global population of Jews is kosher, but even more of them are what we call “kosher style.”

“Kosher style” is how many Jews eat today. This can mean dining on a smoked meat sandwich at a non-kosher deli, or eating a slice of sour cream coffee cake after you’ve had steak for dinner. It can mean Chinese food on paper plates in your home, or a lobster dinner eaten out while on vacation. For many, being Jewish tends to be more about culture than kashrut (the practice of keeping kosher), and it can be confusing at the best of times. I’ll get into the rules of kashrut on page 4. But first, let it be known that this book isn’t just for Jews. It’s also for the other 99 percent of the population.

Recent market research studies peg the kosher-food industry as being worth over $17 billion, and the kosher label’s popularity is growing. In 2009, 27 percent of packaged foods had the kosher denotation, but by 2015, it appeared on over 41 percent of packages. It’s not that the world has suddenly gone meshugenah for kosher food. The reasons behind the dramatic uptick are completely nonreligious. Some people buy kosher food because of perceived cleanliness, others owing to dietary restrictions (such as vegetarians) and still others to avoid certain allergens such as shellfish.

In this book are all the recipes you need for successful shellfish- and pork-free home entertaining, be it for a Jewish holiday or a workaday dinner. From crave-worthy snacks to family-size salads, soulful mains to show-stopping desserts, all of the recipes in this book are doable in the home kitchen and are clearly marked as either a meat dish, dairy dish or pareve (neutral). Think: latkes, knishes, General Tso’s chicken and Toblerone-chunk hamantaschen your family will plotz over.

Kosher Style is for anyone who likes to cook and loves to eat, and it’s especially for those yearning to create new shared memories around a table brimming with history, loved ones and maple-soy brisket.

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SPAtopia

SPAtopia

Unique Spa Experiences from Around the Globe
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
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Toronto Eats

Toronto Eats

100 Signature Recipes from the City's Best Restaurants
edition:Hardcover
tagged : canadian
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Toronto Cooks

Toronto Cooks

100 Signature Recipes from the City's Best Restaurants
edited by Amy Rosen
edition:Hardcover
tagged :
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