About the Author

Rose Murray

Rose Murray has been a key player in the Canadian food scene for almost three decades. Through authoring 10 cookbooks, writing for a host of magazines and newspapers, teaching cuisine at various colleges and cooking schools, and making many television and radio appearances, Rose has helped shape Canada’s culinary landscape since 1979. Growing up on a self-sustaining mixed farm near Collingwood, Ontario, Rose learned the art of growing your own food, as well as cooking and preserving it, at a very young age. It is no wonder that she has come to be considered a national expert on the agricultural traditions that go into our food. After finishing a degree in English from Trinity College at the University of Toronto, Rose went on to teach high school English. Over the years, food started to become a serious interest for Rose again, which led her to more formal food studies in Paris at renowned cooking schools such as Cordon Bleu, La Varenne and Ecole de Gastronomie Francaise Ritze-Escoffier. Rose also took classes in Costa Rica, Hong Kong and Thailand further developing her knowledge and understanding of international food and culture. Back in Canada, Rose has traveled across the country studying Canada’s culinary landscape. From fishing for salmon off Vancouver Island, B.C. and partaking in fall suppers in Saskatchewan to gathering wild rice in Ontario and digging for clams on Prince Edward Island, Rose has experienced what makes up Canada’s culinary fabric first hand. She has channeled this knowledge into her books A Taste of Canada and Canada's Favourite Recipes (out Fall 2012). Rose has two grown children and two grandchildren and now lives in Cambridge, Ontario with her husband Kent.

Books by this Author
125 Best Casseroles and One-Pot Meals
Excerpt

Sample recipe from the "Beef and Veal" section

Easy Beef and Leek Stew in Chive Popovers

I quickly put together this stew one evening before I left the house for a meeting, leaving my husband and son home to stir and eventually enjoy it for dinner. I arrived home to find all kinds of notes on my scribbled recipe, including "Really tasted good" and "Gravy was nice and rich," but alas there was no stew. The two of them had eaten every bit of it and I had to test it again. It goes very well in the popovers (like having gravy on Yorkshire Pudding), but you can enjoy it with crusty bread instead if you like.

Beef and Leek Stew

Makes 4 servings

1 1/4 lb (625g) stew beef 2 tbsp (25mL) olive oil 4 small leeks, thickly sliced 4 carrots, cut in 1-inch (2.5cm) chunks 2 tbsp (25mL) all-purpose flour Salt and pepper 2 tbsp (25mL) balsamic vinegar 2 1/2 cups (625mL) beef stock 1/3 cups (75mL) sun-dried tomato strips 1 tsp (5mL) dried thyme Pinch hot pepper flakes

 

Chive Popovers

Makes 12 popovers.

Popovers are really easy to make. I remember my daughter, Anne, making them often for breakfast when she was a child. You can, of course, substitute other herbs for the chives, or leave them out altogether.

2 eggs 1 cup (250mL) milk 1 cup (250mL) all-purpose flour 2 tbsp (25mL) snipped fresh chives or green onions 1/2 tsp (2mL) salt

 

HINT:
If you wish to make and serve popovers as a breakfast treat, just leave out the chives and pass butter and your favorite jam or honey with the hot popovers.

 

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Hungry for Comfort

Hungry for Comfort

edition:Paperback
also available: Paperback
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Rose Murray's A-Z Vegetable Cookbook

Rose Murray's A-Z Vegetable Cookbook

From asparagus to zucchini and everything in between, 250+ delicious and simple recipes
by Rose Murray
illustrated by Eila Hopper Ross
edition:Hardcover
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Rose Murray's Canadian Christmas Cooking

Rose Murray's Canadian Christmas Cooking

The Classic Guide to Holiday Feasts
edition:Paperback
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Rose Murray's Comfortable Kitchen Cookbook

Rose Murray's Comfortable Kitchen Cookbook

Easy Feel-Good Food For Family and Friends
edition:Paperback
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Taste of Canada

Taste of Canada

A culinary journey
edition:eBook
tagged : seasonal, canadian
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Excerpt

When our children were young, we spent our family holiday in a different province each year. We would either fly and rent a car or drive there and spend days exploring as much of the province as we could. In the few weeks we had, there wasn’t time to discover every corner, but we hoped to give the children a “taste of Canada” before they set off to see the rest of the world. Similarly, this book takes you on a culinary journey across the country. In such a vast country, we won’t go down every lane or visit every kitchen, but you’ll get a glimpse of what grows in various regions and how that affects the cooking of the area. Bordered by three oceans and abundant in freshwater lakes and rivers, rich farmlands and great forests, Canada has attracted immigrants for over four centuries. A distinctive Canadian cuisine developed from interweaving the products of these fertile resources and the food traditions brought by each newcomer. In Canada, everyone has roots in some other place—even First Nations, whose forebears may have been Northeast Asian hunters who followed mastodons across the Bering land bridge or sailed along the ice-free Pacific coast. Some hypothesize the earliest arrivals were ice age Europeans (Solutreans) who sailed to eastern North America. However they came, they spread across the country and developed foods and cultures based on the natural resources: caribou hunters in the Arctic; Micmac (Mi’kmaq) fishermen on the East Coast; agricultural peoples like the Iroquois and Huron nations in parts of southern Quebec and Ontario; nomadic tribes like the Plains Cree and Assiniboine in the Prairies, who depended on bison; and on the West Coast, interior and coastal nations thriving on abundant marine life and wild plants. By the time the first Europeans arrived, they found many indigenous societies well adapted to local climates and food supplies. First Nations foods like pemmican, corn and dried salmon saved the first explorers and fur traders from starvation; later, early settlers across the country survived in part because Native people shared not only their knowledge of our natural food supplies, but also their cooking and preservation methods. Foods, depending on the area, included a wide array of fish, fowl, and mammals, saskatoon berries, blueberries, bakeapples, maple syrup, fiddleheads and wild rice. Regional cooking was born. With their contrasts in geography, climate, history and the backgrounds of people who inhabit them, today’s regions all have their own gastronomic personalities, though there are also many similarities across the country.

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The Christmas Cookbook

Great Canadian Recipes
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
tagged : seasonal
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Food That Really Schmecks

Food That Really Schmecks

by Edna Staebler
introduction by Wayson Choy
foreword by Rose Murray
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
tagged : canadian
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