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Children's Nonfiction Curiosities & Wonders

Chill

Discover the Cool (and Creative) Side of Your Fridge

by (author) Allan Peterkin

illustrated by Mike Shiell

Publisher
Kids Can Press
Initial publish date
Mar 2009
Category
Curiosities & Wonders
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781554533015
    Publish Date
    Mar 2009
    List Price
    $9.95
  • Hardback

    ISBN
    9781554534296
    Publish Date
    Mar 2009
    List Price
    $17.95

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Description

Did you know that a refrigerator has the power to make your spare time more interesting and families more functional? A fridge can also give kids a sense of artistic accomplishment - and even help them make some extra cash. They can also use the fridge to horrify siblings and brainwash parents! Chill is an interactive guide for kids to make their family fridge the most cool and creative in the universe. This colorfully illustrated book, full of comic-strip sections, cool factoids and out-there fridge psychology, includes a history of refrigeration, instructions on how to create special-occasion fridges, 101 things to put on your fridge, the Five Taboo Fridge Behaviors, how to create a fridge art consulting business, crafts, quizzes and games and more. Chill will keep the whole family coming back to the refrigerator again and again - and not just to rummage for snacks.

About the authors

Allan Peterkin is the author of One Thousand Beards and One Thousand Mustaches, and the co-author of The Bearded Gentleman. His other books include The Bald-Headed Hermit and the Artichoke and Outbursts!. His comments on facial hair have appeared in Esquire, Men's Health, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, US, and in the documentary Mansome. He is a doctor and freelance writer in Toronto.

Allan Peterkin's profile page

Like most kids, Mike liked to draw and once he started to get recognition for his drawings, he drew more and more. He also liked to make people laugh, so put those two things together and you have a cartoonist on your hands.Many of Mike's funny ideas come from observing the world around him and twisting everyday occurrences into funny and sometimes totally absurd cartoons, drawings and short animated films. Mike's cartoons and illustrations have appeared in many magazines, books and greeting cards in North America and Europe. His animated series, The Melon Shorts, has appeared in numerous film festivals around the world and has won a number of awards.Mike is the illustrator of the Gross Science series of books written by Edward Kay. The three titles in the series are Stinky Science, Germy Science and Poopy Science. Both Stinky Science and Germy Science are being adapted into an animated TV series. Mike is excited to be making his debut as an author-illustrator with the graphic novel Linty: A Pocketful of Adventure.Even on his most stressful and not-so-fun days, Mike reminds himself that he is making a living doing the thing that he had dreamed of doing when he was a little kid ... so he tries not to be too whiny. Instagram: @linty2022 Facebook: @linty2022 Twitter: @Wandering88

Mike Shiell's profile page

Editorial Reviews

While the book is written in a tongue-incheek style and is highly humorous, it also presents a wealth of factual information.

A colorful collection of comic-strip sections, cool factoids, and out-there fridge psychology.

Librarian Reviews

Chill: Discover the Cool (and Creative) Side of Your Fridge

Chill: Discover the Cool (and Creative) Side of Your Fridge is a funny, colourful and extremely informative tell-all book for children. This hilarious text is packed full of interesting facts, comic-strips, quizzes, activities and ideas to not only entertain but educate the reader. Allan Peterkin’s writing is fluid and humorous weaving factual information with witty commentary. The illustrations are bright and appealing – a perfect backdrop for everything and anything you would ever want to know about your fridge.

The text is divided into five sections. The first focuses on the history of refrigeration and the inevitable rise of a new art form – fridge art. The second section focuses on the science behind refrigeration and the psychological implications of fridge art. The third section provides the reader with a multitude of ideas on how to decorate your fridge, including a list of the 101 things you should hang on your fridge and a shorter list of the five things you should never hang on your fridge. The fourth section gives further tips and tricks to decorate your fridge to earn a possible profit, while the fifth and final section provides the reader with additional fridgecentric information. Overall, a great text full of interesting facts and great ideas.

Source: The Canadian Children's Bookcentre. Spring 2009. Vol.32 No.2.

Other titles by Allan Peterkin

Other titles by Mike Shiell