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Self-Improvement Books

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Books to complete a task in an upcoming Canadian book challenge to read a self-help book in an area you would like to improve or investigate.
12 Rules for Life

12 Rules for Life

An Antidote to Chaos
edition:Hardcover

#1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER 
#1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you …

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Excerpt

A RELIGIOUS PROBLEM
It does not seem reasonable to describe the young man who shot twenty children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 as a religious person. This is equally true for the Colorado theatre gunman and the Columbine High School killers. But these murderous individuals had a problem with reality that existed at a religious depth. As one of the members of the Columbine duo wrote:

"The human race isn’t worth fighting for, only worth killing. Give the Earth back to the animals. They deserve it infinitely more than we do. Nothing means anything anymore."

People who think such things view Being itself as inequitable and harsh to the point of corruption, and human Being, in particular, as con­temptible. They appoint themselves supreme adjudicators of reality and find it wanting. They are the ultimate critics. The deeply cynical writer continues:

"If you recall your history, the Nazis came up with a 'final solution' to the Jewish problem. . . . Kill them all. Well, in case you haven’t figured it out, I say 'KILL MANKIND.' No one should survive."
For such individuals, the world of experience is insufficient and evil—so to hell with everything!

What is happening when someone comes to think in this manner? A great German play, Faust: A Tragedy, written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, addresses that issue. The play’s main character, a scholar named Heinrich Faust, trades his immortal soul to the devil, Mephistopheles. In return, he receives whatever he desires while still alive on Earth. In Goethe’s play, Mephistopheles is the eternal adver­sary of Being. He has a central, defining credo:

"I am the spirit who negates
and rightly so, for all that comes to be
deserves to perish, wretchedly.
It were better nothing would begin!
Thus everything that your terms sin,
destruction, evil represent—
that is my proper element." 

Goethe considered this hateful sentiment so important—so key to the central element of vengeful human destructiveness—that he had Mephistopheles say it a second time, phrased somewhat differently, in Part II of the play, written many years later.

People think often in the Mephistophelean manner, although they seldom act upon their thoughts as brutally as the mass murderers of school, college and theatre. Whenever we experience injustice, real or imagined; whenever we encounter tragedy or fall prey to the machi­nations of others; whenever we experience the horror and pain of our own apparently arbitrary limitations—the temptation to question Being and then to curse it rises foully from the darkness. Why must innocent people suffer so terribly? What kind of bloody, horrible planet is this, anyway?

Life is in truth very hard. Everyone is destined for pain and slated for destruction. Sometimes suffering is clearly the result of a personal fault such as willful blindness, poor decision-making or malevolence. In such cases, when it appears to be self-inflicted, it may even seem just. People get what they deserve, you might contend. That’s cold com­fort, however, even when true. Sometimes, if those who are suffering changed their behaviour, then their lives would unfold less tragically. But human control is limited. Susceptibility to despair, disease, aging and death is universal. In the final analysis, we do not appear to be the architects of our own fragility. Whose fault is it, then?

People who are very ill (or, worse, who have a sick child) will inevi­tably find themselves asking this question, whether they are religious believers or not. The same is true of someone who finds his shirtsleeve caught in the gears of a giant bureaucracy—who is suffering through a tax audit, or fighting an interminable lawsuit or divorce. And it’s not only the obviously suffering who are tormented by the need to blame someone or something for the intolerable state of their Being. At the height of his fame, influence and creative power, for example, the towering Leo Tolstoy himself began to question the value of human existence. He reasoned in this way:

"My position was terrible. I knew that I could find nothing in the way of rational knowledge except a denial of life; and in faith I could find nothing except a denial of reason, and this was even more impossible than a denial of life. According to rational knowledge, it followed that life is evil, and people know it. They do not have to live, yet they have lived and they do live, just as I myself had lived, even though I had known for a long time that life is meaningless and evil."

Try as he might, Tolstoy could identify only four means of escaping from such thoughts. One was retreating into childlike ignorance of the problem. Another was pursuing mindless pleasure. The third was "continuing to drag out a life that is evil and meaningless, knowing beforehand that nothing can come of it." He identified that particular form of escape with weakness: "The people in this category know that death is better than life, but they do not have the strength to act ratio­nally and quickly put an end to the delusion by killing themselves. . . ."

Only the fourth and final mode of escape involved "strength and energy. It consists of destroying life, once one has realized that life is evil and meaningless." Tolstoy relentlessly followed his thoughts:

"Only unusually strong and logically consistent people act in this manner. Having realized all the stupidity of the joke that is being played on us and seeing that the blessings of the dead are greater than those of the living and that it is better not to exist, they act and put an end to this stupid joke; and they use any means of doing it: a rope around the neck, water, a knife in the heart, a train."

Tolstoy wasn’t pessimistic enough. The stupidity of the joke being played on us does not merely motivate suicide. It motivates murder—mass murder, often followed by suicide. That is a far more effective existential protest. By June of 2016, unbelievable as it may seem, there had been one thousand mass killings (defined as four or more people shot in a single incident, excluding the shooter) in the US in twelve hundred and sixty days. That’s one such event on five of every six days for more than three years. Everyone says, "We don’t understand." How can we still pretend that? Tolstoy understood, more than a century ago. The ancient authors of the biblical story of Cain and Abel under­stood, as well, more than twenty centuries ago. They described murder as the first act of post-Edenic history: and not just murder, but fratri­cidal murder—murder not only of someone innocent but of someone ideal and good, and murder done consciously to spite the creator of the universe. Today’s killers tell us the same thing, in their own words. Who would dare say that this is not the worm at the core of the apple? But we will not listen, because the truth cuts too close to the bone. Even for a mind as profound as that of the celebrated Russian author, there was no way out. How can the rest of us manage, when a man of Tolstoy’s stature admits defeat? For years, he hid his guns from himself and would not walk with a rope in hand, in case he hanged himself.

How can a person who is awake avoid outrage at the world?

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The Productivity Project

The Productivity Project

Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy
edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback

A fresh, personal, and entertaining exploration of a topic that concerns all of us: how to be more productive at work and in every facet of our lives.
 
Chris Bailey turned down lucrative job offers to pursue a lifelong dream—to spend a year performing a deep dive experiment into the pursuit of productivity, a subject he had been enamored with since he was a teenager. After obtaining his business degree, he created a blog to chronicle a year-long series of productivity experiments he conducte …

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The Map

The Map

Finding the Magic and Meaning in the Story of Your Life
edition:Paperback
tagged : new thought

       Intuitive counselorColette Baron-Reid is renowned for helping people create the purposeful and authentic lives they desire. In this fascinating book, Colette hands you the “magic wand” of your own awareness so that you can begin to perceive your life as a wonderful adventure, and see yourself as an enchanted mapmaker.

      Enter a deep journey into your inner landscape and meet the imaginary beings that hold the keys to the wisdom hidden in your subconscious: the Wizard of Awareness, …

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The Obesity Code

The Obesity Code

Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss
also available: Paperback

Everything you believe about how to lose weight is wrong. Weight gain and obesity are driven by hormones - in everyone - and only by understanding the effects of insulin and insulin resistance can we achieve lasting weight loss.

In this and provocative book, Dr. Jason Fung sets out an original, robust theory of obesity that provides startling insights into proper nutrition. In addition to his five basic steps - a set of lifelong habits that will improve your health and control your insulin level …

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The Diabetes Code

The Diabetes Code

Prevent and Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally
edition:Paperback

“Dr. Jason Fung has done it again. In easy to follow, simple steps and rules, Dr. Fung gives you the tools to rid yourself of diabetes forever. Get this book!”
Dr. Steven R. Gundry, author of The Plant Paradox

The must-have guide to reversing and preventing type 2 diabetes through intermittent fasting and a low-carb, high-fat diet—from Dr. Jason Fung, internationally bestselling author of The Obesity Code.

Today, most doctors, dietitians, and even diabetes specialists consider type 2 diab …

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Aging Backwards

Aging Backwards

Reverse the Aging Process and Look 10 Years Younger in 30 Minutes a Day
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover

Revised and updated: the New York Times and Globe and Mail bestseller from the star of PBS's Classical Stretch. This groundbreaking guide to reversing the effects of aging through gentle, scientifically designed exercises has been updated with a new chapter about the emerging research on the importance of healthy connective tissue--which reinforces the wisdom and science behind Miranda's pioneeing approach to exercise. Our paperback release is timed to a new PBS pledge-break special, Aging Backw …

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The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, Special 15th Anniversary Edition

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, Special 15th Anniversary Edition

edition:eBook

Includes a bonus excerpt of Robin Sharma's upcoming The Secret Letters of the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari.

With more than four million copies sold in fifty-one languages, The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari launched a bestselling series and continues to help people from every walk of life live with far greater success, happiness and meaning in these times of dramatic uncertainty.

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari celebrates the story of Julian Mantle, a successful but misguided lawyer whose physical and emoti …

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Cheat On Your Husband (with Your Husband)

Cheat On Your Husband (with Your Husband)

How to Date Your Spouse
edition:Paperback
tagged : marriage

There's an old joke that after years of marriage a man complains, "She changed!" and a woman complains "He didn't!" Just as change is a part of life, it's also a part of marriage—a healthy and normal part of it. But just because things have changed doesn't mean you shouldn't recognize yourself or your relationship with your husband.

Too many women wake up in their marriages and ask themselves, "Is this it?" After years of sharing domestic duties, raising kids, and balancing careers, many of us …

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