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Editors' Picks: Week of March 11–17
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Editors' Picks: Week of March 11–17

By kileyturner
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For those who love to explore cuisines from around the world, this list is for you, stretching from Vietnam to France and into the Middle East.
Flavours of Aleppo

Flavours of Aleppo

Celebrating Syrian Cuisine
edition:Paperback

Aleppo is Syria's second largest city and one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Located at the crossroads of some of the world's great historic commercial routes linking Europe and Asia, Aleppo has developed a diverse cuisine that is considered to be one of the best in the Arab world.

Turkey, Greece, Armenia and the rest of the Levant influence Aleppian cuisine but it is its own seasonings and presentation that make Syrian food especially appealing. Flavours of Aleppo cel …

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Excerpt

Of all the diverse images from my childhood that run through my imagination, those connected to family cuisine are the most memorable. Memories of the aromas that wafted from my mother's kitchen are ingrained in me and are what prompted me to write this book with her. My mother inherited her culinary knowledge from her mother, my grandmother, who was originally from Aleppo, a city with a well-established reputation in gastronomy.

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Secrets from My Vietnamese Kitchen

Secrets from My Vietnamese Kitchen

Simple Recipes from My Many Mothers
edition:Hardcover

A warm and welcoming introduction to a vibrant cuisine, with more than 50 easy to make recipes from internationally bestselling novelist Kim Thúy.

Between careers as a lawyer and an acclaimed novelist, Kim Thúy ran a celebrated restaurant called Ru de Nam in Montreal. Now, in her first cookbook, Kim combines her beautiful storytelling style with simple and wonderful recipes that are full of flavour: surprising yet comforting, and easy enough for every day. Welcoming us into her close-knit circ …

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Excerpt

From the Introduction

The moment you step inside a Vietnamese house, you are bombarded with variations on a single greeting: “Have you eaten?” “What would you like to eat?” “Come and eat.” “Just one little bite.” “The chicken I cooked is still hot.” “Here, try my cream puffs.”

We are not in the habit of verbalizing our joys, or even less, our affection. We use food as a tool for expressing our emotions. My parents don’t say, “We’ve missed you,” but rather, “We’ve made some spring rolls,” knowing that I love to eat them anytime, anywhere. Similarly, when I’m traveling abroad on a book tour, they will report that my sons had three helpings of everything, as a way to reassure me. On our visits to my grandmother in New York, my mother would stuff the trunk with her own mother’s favorite dishes. My father would laugh at her, but he still flies to Washington, D.C., and loads Vietnamese dishes into the trunk of the car that will take him to my uncle’s house in a remote part of Pennsylvania. That ninety-two-year-old uncle is my father’s older brother, who fed and housed him during my father’s time at university. My father considers him a father figure, and he tries to express his gratitude through the best sausage, the best lemongrass beef stew, the best steamed pancakes, the best sticky rice cake, and the best dried shrimp to be found in the Vietnamese markets.

In the refugee camps, my mother and Aunts 6 and 8 would do their best to transform the fish rations we’d receive six days out of seven in an effort to bring a semblance of normality to mealtimes. One day my mother was able to make a thin dough for dumplings. I remember very clearly how she was sitting on the ground with the cover of the barrel that we used as a water tank. She rolled out her dough on that rusty metal plate, which here and there still bore spots of its original yellow paint. The meal that followed was almost beside the point—we were just thrilled to see her cooking something other than rice and fish. It was a moment of togetherness, of celebration.

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The Scent of Pomegranates and Rose Water

The Scent of Pomegranates and Rose Water

Reviving the Beautiful Food Traditions of Syria
edition:Hardcover

The traditions of Syrian cooking, which go back hundreds of years, are notable for their sensory components, in which aroma and texture are as important as taste and nutrition. Over the centuries, the unique dishes of Greater Syria (bilaad al-shaam) were preserved by those who cooked them. For cooks in imperial households, family homes, or on simple peasant farms, recipes were handed down from generation to generation. Despite centuries of occupation, economic hardships, and political strife, th …

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Bottom of the Pot

Bottom of the Pot

Persian Recipes and Stories
edition:Hardcover

Winner of the IACP 2019 First Book Award presented by The Julia Child Foundation

Like Madhur Jaffrey and Marcella Hazan before her, Naz Deravian will introduce the pleasures and secrets of her mother culture's cooking to a broad audience that has no idea what it's been missing. America will not only fall in love with Persian cooking, it'll fall in love with Naz.”-Samin Nosrat, author ofSalt, Fat, Acid, Heat: The Four Elements of Good Cooking

Naz Deravian lays out the multi-hued canvas of a Persi …

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In the French Kitchen with Kids

In the French Kitchen with Kids

Easy, Everyday Dishes for the Whole Family to Make and Enjoy
edition:Paperback

Shortlisted for the 2019 Taste Canada Awards! From the writer and recipe developer behind eat. live. travel. write comes a new cookbook for parents, children and Francophiles of all ages. Forget the fuss and bring simple, delicious French dishes to your home kitchen with Mardi Michels as your guide.

Twice a week during the school year, you'll find Mardi Michels--French teacher and the well-known blogger behind eat. live. travel. write--directing up to a dozen children in her school's science lab …

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Excerpt

From the Introduction

There is a lot of joy in teaching kids to cook, but sometimes I’m so focused on getting everyone out the door on time that I don’t stop to take in all that we’ve accomplished. That we made pastry from scratch, and then we made quiches, and then while they were baking, we made more pastry and cleaned up, for example. In 60 minutes. But when I’m dismissing the boys and I stop to breathe, I look at their faces and I get it. Just like the parents when they pick up their boys. What’s going on is joy, creativity and, most of all, learning.

One of the greatest pleasures of teaching kids to cook comes from working with their can-do attitude, which has encouraged me in my own baking and cooking to just “have a go.” The boys NEVER think something can’t be done unless they’ve been told it’s supposed to be hard. Puff pastry? Choux pastry? Sushi? Molecular cuisine? Working alongside some of the country’s top chefs? No problem for kids who believe they can do anything. Teaching kids cooking is also about embracing their natural confidence and making them feel that anything is possible. That they can cook.

So, why a French cookbook for kids? Well, France is a country dear to my heart. I lived there for years in my late 20s and have been back countless times since I moved to Canada from my native Australia. We own a little house in southwest France, so a part of me is always there. I love writing about French culture and the French language. And, of course, I love teaching kids to cook, and I am always on the lookout for ways to incorporate a little cooking into the French as a Second Language curriculum because, well, pourquoi pas? As I’ve watched my cooking club evolve over the years to include more complex recipes that many people don’t think kids are capable of making (with a little help, of course!), the idea for this book was born. Kids can cook French food! Because despite what many people think, French food is not all sophisticated haute cuisine. At home, French people eat and cook mostly simple dishes. Dishes I know my cooking club members would love to make and eat. This book features real French food for kids, a little bit of culture, and some French language lessons too! I hope to take the intimidation factor out of French food through recipes for everyday dishes that children and their parents can make and eat together. Because you know what? Kids can cook. You just have to let them!

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Modern Israeli Cooking

Modern Israeli Cooking

100 New Recipes for Traditional Classics
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover

Oron studied at The French Culinary Institute-now the International Culinary Center-and draws cooking inspiration from her Israeli and Moroccan background. Oron is the chef and owner of Moo Milk Bar in Toronto. In Modern Israeli Cooking, Oron offers an incredible collection of Israeli recipes for the modern home cook.

Oron takes inspiration from dishes like Schnitzel platters, potato latkes and falafel and adapts them with a modern eye to create Israeli-inspired recipes like Cornflake-Crusted Sc …

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