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By Carleigh Baker
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Interesting looking non-fiction.
Violence Against Indigenous Women

Violence Against Indigenous Women

Literature, Activism, Resistance
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback

Violence against Indigenous women in Canada is an ongoing crisis, with roots deep in the nation’s colonial history. Despite numerous policies and programs developed to address the issue, Indigenous women continue to be targeted for violence at disproportionate rates. What insights can literature contribute where dominant anti-violence initiatives have failed? Centring the voices of contemporary Indigenous women writers, this book argues for the important role that literature and storytelling c …

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Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story

Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story

edition:eBook
also available: Paperback

Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story is the first comparative study of eight internationally and nationally acclaimed writers of short fiction: Sandra Birdsell, Timothy Findley, Jack Hodgins, Thomas King, Alistair MacLeod, Olive Senior, Carol Shields and Guy Vanderhaeghe. With the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature going to Alice Munro, the “master of the contemporary short story,” this art form is receiving the recognition that has been its due and—as this book demonstrates—Canadian wr …

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Canadian Graphic

Canadian Graphic

Picturing Life Narratives
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook

Canadian Graphic: Picturing Life Narratives presents critical essays on contemporary Canadian cartoonists working in graphic life narrative, from confession to memoir to biography. The contributors draw on literary theory, visual studies, and cultural history to show how Canadian cartoonists have become so prominent in the international market for comic books based on real-life experiences. The essays explore the visual styles and storytelling techniques of Canadian cartoonists, as well as their …

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Memory Serves

Memory Serves

Oratories
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook

Memory Serves gathers together the oratories award-winning author Lee Maracle has delivered and performed over a twenty-year period. Revised for publication, the lectures hold the features and style of oratory intrinsic to the Salish people in general and the Sto: lo in particular. From her Coast Salish perspective and with great eloquence, Maracle shares her knowledge of Sto: lo history, memory, philosophy, law, spirituality, feminism and the colonial condition of her people.

Powerful and inspir …

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Excerpt

Memory Serves

Memory serves. It is directed by condition, culture, and objective. It is conjured by systemic practice. It is shaped by results. By the time humans are seven years old, the commitment to remember is shaped, and they remember from the point of view of their social milieu.

In a society, which relies on a trial process, memory serves as evidence, as objective proof based on facts. Evidence and facts are collected with the intent to prove some hypothesis or thesis. This proof then becomes the basis for judgment, decision or action.

This is a simple system that fails to count humans as variable, as spirited, creative, and emotional beings. It is a simple system that fails to account for catastrophe, social and personal trauma, and how humans fall off track.

In a society, which is hierarchical, held up by armies, police, punitive deterrents and authoritarian-based respectability, the human as variable does not need to be considered. What needs to be known to humans before a decision is made is who has the authority to make it; what the law or policy governing the decision is; what the place of the author in the decision-making ladder is; and what the parameters of the author's decision-making authority are. People are expected to obey the decision or be punished for their disobedience.

The proof then returns full circle as the basis for conviction or alienation of the dissident. Memory does not exist for any other social purpose. Facts are defined as objective memory. The rememberers strive to record evidence and achieve objectivity. Recorded objective memory is embraced as the only valid memory. The realm of spiritual intent, creative motive or human emotion is relegated to subjectivity and persuasion; the art of engaging others in dialogue, embracing their emotional spiritual and intellectual sensibility, has no place.

Each witness becomes part of the argument between defense and prosecution. Justice is not a consideration. What happened, the activities of the humans, the facts surrounding the case and the law, is all that is considered.

When humans give breath to life, give voice to their perception of life, this is a sacred act. They are taking an event that has already been committed and they are re-membering or reconstructing it in their minds.

Memory serves. In a society governed first and foremost by spirit to spirit relationships to all beings, memory serves much differently than in a society in which property possession determines importance. To re-member is, first, directional. Indigenous people commit to memory those events and the aspects of those events that suit the direction we are moving in or the direction we want to move in if a shift is occurring. I choose to remember what happens to Sockeye because that is the direction from which Salish people move. We re-member events; we reconstruct them because we are aware that they have already ended, are dis-membered, gone forever, and because they affect us and are directly connected to who we are as a people. We may wish to achieve a new direction, secure an old direction, or mark the path travelled so that others may find the path easier to follow. Our memories serve the foregoing. Who or what is important does not figure into it. This is what governs our lives and shapes our oracy. Memory is also the governor of native literacy.

Creative non-fiction is bound by the original foundations handed to us by ancestors, ceremony, laws, and our relationship to creation. We place our obligations before us when we re-member. To what end do I wish to re-create this moment? What direction do I wish this memory to travel in the future? In so doing we hang on to memories of those things that assist us in conjuring and travelling in the direction charted by the culture that has shaped us. We let go those things that will impair our journey or thwart the courage required to secure our path. We determine the direction we believe we wish to travel before we speak or make a truckload of decisions. The direction we are travelling shapes our memories whether we are conscious of this or not.

Our intent governs our choice of words in recalling events. The winds are our uncles. Our cultures name them and define their relationship to us. Wind, breath, and voice are about where you want to end up, not about what happened or what facts you have assimilated to bolster your thoughts. Facts are mathematical things, quantities intended to persuade the thoughtless and the spiritless. Our direction is rooted to the imagined relationship between two or more beings from the beginning of the relationship to the end of their journey. The winds breathed life into our bodies. We share the winds, and reflect their directional qualities. It is our breath, our spirit, and our heart that are articulated when we open our mouth. Where you are going with this is the question we all recognize.

I love the bones that are stones. . .

Stone is our oldest grandfather. We refer to the stones that keep our songs and stories as grandfathers. Our grandfathers give us the rock on which we stand, but our grandmothers move us from that stone in the direction of relation with others. They are the keepers of the stories that teach us about relations; they are the flesh of our bones that are stones. I carry them, willingly.

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Daniel David Moses

Daniel David Moses

Spoken and Written Explorations of His Work
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
tagged : canadian

This work is a compelling examination and discussion of the work of Daniel David Moses. Including pieces by Indigenous and non-Indigenous authors, storytellers, playwrights, academics and artists, participating in narratives, writing and dialogues about Moses and his work, the book is at once engaging, grounded in comparative analysis and forceful.

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Educating the Imagination

Educating the Imagination

Northrop Frye, Past, Present, and Future
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover Paperback
tagged : canadian

Northrop Frye's long career made him Canada's most creative public intellectual. A century after his birth, his many books demonstrate a powerful vision of the resources of the human imagination. Frye's critical theory sought the continuities linking human creation in all spheres of life, trusting in the idea of a single human community sharing myths, stories, and images that express shared visions and desires.

The essays in Educating the Imagination illustrate the extraordinary range of Frye's …

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Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau

Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau

Art and the Colonial Narrative in the Canadian Media
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook Hardcover

"Mythologizing Norval Morrisseau" examines the complex identities assigned to Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau. Was he an uneducated artist plagued by alcoholism and homelessness? Was Morrisseau a shaman artist who tapped a deep spiritual force? Or was he simply one of Canada’s most significant artists?

Carmen L. Robertson charts both the colonial attitudes and the stereotypes directed at Morrisseau and other Indigenous artists in Canada’s national press. Robertson also examines Morrissea …

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From the Tundra to the Trenches

From the Tundra to the Trenches

edition:eBook
also available: Paperback Hardcover

“My name is Weetaltuk; Eddy Weetaltuk. My Eskimo tag name is E9-422.” So begins From the "Tundra to the Trenches." Weetaltuk means “innocent eyes” in Inuktitut, but to the Canadian government, he was known as E9-422: E for Eskimo, 9 for his community, 422 to identify Eddy.

In 1951, Eddy decided to leave James Bay. Because Inuit weren’t allowed to leave the North, he changed his name and used this new identity to enlist in the Canadian Forces: Edward Weetaltuk, E9-422, became Eddy Vital, …

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