About the Author

John Sewell

JOHN SEWELL served as an alderman on Toronto City Council during the 1970s and was mayor of Toronto from 1978 to 1980. He chaired the Metro Toronto Housing Authority from 1986 to 1988 and the Commission on Planning and Development Reform in Ontario from 1991 to 1993. Sewell wrote an urban affairs column for The Globe and Mail from 1984 to 1986, currently writes for Now, a Toronto weekly, and is the author of Up Against City Hall, Police: Urban Policing in Canada, and the recently published The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning.

Books by this Author
Houses and Homes

Houses and Homes

Housing for Canadians
edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback
tagged : residential
More Info
How We Changed Toronto

How We Changed Toronto

The inside story of twelve creative, tumultuous years in civic life, 1969-1980
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
More Info
Mackenzie

Mackenzie

A Political Biography
edition:Hardcover
tagged : historical
More Info
Police

Police

Urban Policing in Canada
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
More Info
Police in Canada

Police in Canada

The Real Story
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
tagged : criminology
More Info
Excerpt

Preface My interest in policing issues began when I was a member of Toronto City Council during the 1970s and early 1980s. When teaching at York University in the early 1980s, I was asked to devise a course on policing, and that led to my 1985 book, Police: Urban Policing in Canada. As I turned to other activities my interest did not wane, but there was always a problem of finding a forum for expressing ideas about police. In the late 1990s, I helped establish the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition (TPAC). For more than a decade, this organization has met monthly to try to understand the policing world and to discuss police policies in a constructive manner. It hasn't always been easy. For instance, Toronto police chief Julian Fantino sued me for libel and slander for what he said was a misinterpretation of a Supreme Court of Canada ruling about the way the Toronto police force carried out strip searches. I had to find money to retain a lawyer and agree to apologize for whatever I had said, but in that apology I stated that I would continue to press for a better strip-search policy to be used by Toronto police. (As noted in this book, we were not successful in reducing the number of strip searches carried out by Toronto police: almost one-third of all those police in canada arrested are strip searched, even though the Supreme Court stated that strip searching should be done rarely.) TPAC has produced a bimonthly electronic bulletin since 2002 (available at www.tpac.ca), and it traces many policing issues in Toronto over this eight-year period. Then, in 2007, I taught a one-semester course in policing at Ryerson University. This book emerged as a result of that activity. In writing Police in Canada, I have been amazed at just how little has changed since 1985. Some of the most interesting thinking about police activities occurred in the 1970s and 1980s (as one notes from the essays in David Bayley's recent book, What Works in Policing), and since then it seems most police forces have been closed to experimentation and external study. This makes the case for needed change all that more urgent. I thank my friend Jim Lorimer for asking me to do this book, and for the editorial assistance of Diane Young at Lorimer's and Alison Reid. This book is dedicated to my long-term colleagues at TPAC, Anna, Richard, Harvey, and Else Marie, who have been strong friends in reviewing and acting on this most important of public policy issues over the years.

close this panel
Shape of the Suburbs

Shape of the Suburbs

Understanding Toronto's Sprawl
edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback eBook
More Info
The Shape of the City

The Shape of the City

Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning
by John Sewell
introduction by Jane Jacobs
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
More Info
Show editions
close this panel

User Activity

more >
X
Contacting facebook
Please wait...