About the Author

Jacqueline Guest

Award-winning author JACQUELINE GUEST is the author of numerous Lorimer novels, including the Arthur Ellis Award nominee Wild Ride and A Goal in Sight, which was shortlisted for a Golden Eagle Children's Choice Book Award. Many of her novels have also been Canadian Children's Centre Our Choice selections including the SideStreets novel At Risk, and the Sports Stories novels Hat Trick, Free Throw, and Soccer Star. Jacqueline Guest lives in Bragg Creek, Alberta.

www.jacquelineguest.com/index.htm

Books by this Author
A Goal in Sight

A Goal in Sight

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tagged : peer pressure
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Chapter 1 Aiden Walsh timed his strike perfectly. Gripping his hockey stick tightly with both hands, he lined up his target in his sights and went in for the kill. The kid never knew what hit him. The guy hit the boards with a satisfying whump, then went down onto the ice. The ref's whistle blew before Aiden had taken half a stride. Aiden didn't bother looking at the ref. He knew he'd drawn a five-minute major for cross-checking but he didn't care. He'd taken the Springhill Rangers' lead scorer out. He knew the coach would keep the guy on the bench for a couple of shifts to recover and with so little time left in the game, that's all Aiden's team, the Oakridge Devils, would need. They were in the lead and now, they would keep it. The rest of the Rangers were next to useless at goal scoring and posed no threat. Here in Calgary, Alberta, everyone knew Aiden Walsh was the toughest defenceman in the league and the Devils were winners because of it. Aiden glided over to the penalty box. He wouldn't have much time once he'd sat out his stupid penalty, but he wanted to nuke one more guy before the end of the game. He scanned the ice for the irritating forward. The kid's jersey advertised him as Walberg 33. He was fast and way too accurate with his shots. The annoying winger was the only remaining Ranger who might be a threat to the Devils' lead. Walberg had also checked him hard, sending Aiden into the boards and that was something Aiden couldn't let the guy get away with. He had a reputation to uphold. They'd been dicing all game and Aiden wanted to teach the guy a real lesson about messing with the Devils?and Aiden Walsh. Anxiously, he watched the action on the ice. He was itching to get back out there. He always hated having to waste precious minutes in the penalty box, but that was all part of playing tough hockey. Looking up into the stands behind the Devils' bench, Aiden saw his dad, Charlie, in his usual seat. Aiden had always called his dad Charlie, which suited the big man more than Daddy or Father. Charlie wasn't the kind of guy who liked soft and fuzzy. Charlie waved at Aiden and gave the thumbs-up sign, then pounded his fist into the palm of his hand. This was their signal that it was a great hit and his dad really approved. Aiden grinned back and nodded his head. His dad pointed to a Ranger player on the ice. It was Walberg 33. Charlie had apparently spotted him as a problem as well. Aiden watched the skater for a moment, then nodded his head at his dad, agreeing. All he needed was a couple of minutes to set up his run at his final target of the game. "Try to spend more time on the ice than in the penalty box, Aiden!" Jamie Cook, the Devils' captain, called as he skated past. "You do your job, Cook, and I'll do mine," Aiden yelled back, keeping his eyes on the Ranger forward. He and Jamie used to be friends, but lately they hadn't been getting along very well. The guy should make up his mind what he wanted. Aiden's tactics had never been questioned before. He was the Devils' muscle and he'd always done a great job at taking out players who got in the way of a win. Sure he took a lot of penalties, but that was part of it. "I'm trying, but I need all my players to be on the same side!" Jamie called over his shoulder. Aiden shook his head, irritated. Jamie was referring to earlier in the game when, while trying to crush one of the opposition into the boards, Aiden had miscalculated and bounced Steven Becker, the Devils' forward, instead. Accidents happen. It wasn't his fault Steven hadn't been fast enough in getting out of the way! After what seemed like forever, the penalty box timekeeper released him. He hit the ice with his skates on fire. Walberg 33 was at the other end of the rink in his own zone. Aiden circled the far side of the ice, ignoring the puck action and zeroing in on his target. The forward saw him coming and headed back down to the Devils' end. Aiden started picking up speed, calculating just where he would take him out. He was totally focused. The shrill of the buzzer signalling the end of the game made Aiden's head snap up. He thought he had a couple more minutes and that's all he would have needed. The Devils had won 6–3. That meant the Devils were closing in on first place in the Calgary Minor Hockey League, something the team had never done before. He spotted Walberg skating toward the Rangers' bench and debated on whether he should take him out anyway, but decided he could wait until their next game together. Aiden lined up with the other players to shake hands. He noticed a lot of the Ranger players didn't want to shake his hand, but he didn't care. They weren't important; they were losers?6–3 losers! After changing, Aiden headed out to the parking lot to wait for his dad to pull up in their old Chevy truck. He looked up at the night sky. Large flakes of snow were softly falling out of the darkness. He could feel them land on his eyelashes and cheeks

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Belle of Batoche

Belle of Batoche

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Belle hadn't meant to stay so long. It must be after eight o'clock, way past breakfast. How was she going to explain? Suddenly Belle stopped, listening intently as an unfamiliar sound drifted to her on the early morning breeze. Then she recognized what it was. Gunfire! Batoche was under attack!

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Death by Dinosaur

Death by Dinosaur

A Sam Stellar Mystery
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Hat Trick

Hat Trick

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Chapter 1 Leigh Aberdeen tightened her grip on her hockey stick. Her eyes flicked to the player on her left. His gaze was riveted on the ref's hand, which held the puck. The puck hit the ice and Leigh's reflexes took over. She cut in front of the other player, outmanoeuvred him and headed down the ice. She watched as the centre for her team sent the puck speeding out to meet her. Swerving, Leigh intercepted the puck and turned toward the far net. She could hear the crowd screaming. Her team, the Forest Park Falcons, were tied with the Devon Dynamos with two minutes left in the third period. This was the closest they'd come to beating their arch rivals all season. Leigh caught a glimpse of both Dynamo defencemen streaking toward her. If she could keep out of their reach, she had a good chance of setting up her shot well enough to beat the Dynamo goalie. Suddenly, out of the corner of her eye, she saw the flash of a green uniform. It was Jimmy Crane, the captain of the Falcons, coming up on her side, fast. What was he doing? He should be running interference for her with the two Devon players. "Pass me the puck," Jimmy shouted at her. "I'm nearly set up!" she yelled back through her face mask. "Take these two out." She dodged around one of the defencemen who'd caught up with her. "I'm the captain. I call the plays," Jimmy said, bumping her out of the way. Leigh was so surprised, her stick jerked, sending the puck spinning out of control down the ice. Her balance was way off. She felt her skates starting to slip. Her arms automatically came up to help centre herself. Unfortunately, when her arms came up, so did her stick. She felt the butt end hit the shoulder of the Dynamo defenceman who had moved in behind her. The whistle went before she had a chance to lower her arms. The ref was pointing at her and signalling with his hands. Leigh knew she had a two-minute penalty for high-sticking. There was only time for one more play, and now the Falcons would be shorthanded. She sat in the penalty box, watching as the two teams formed up for a faceoff in Falcon territory. The puck hit the ice with a smack. Both centres were on it instantly. The Falcon centre tapped it out to a defenceman who passed it up ice to the waiting forward. Leigh held her breath. If he could make a break for it, he might get a chance to score. The Dynamos were all over the guy. He had no one to pass to until the other defenceman could break out. The Falcons needed their extra forward, the one sitting in the penalty box. Leigh watched as the two Devon defencemen moved in on the lone Falcon forward. They stripped him of the puck, turned and headed back toward the Falcon goal. It was amazing to see what a difference one extra player on the ice could make. The Dynamos headed down the ice like a killer wave. The Falcons tried to intercept the passing, but they were spread too thin. Leigh watched as the Dynamos passed the puck back and forth, waiting for their chance. The puck went rink wide as one of the Dynamo forwards passed it to his partner. Suddenly, the Dynamo centre cut to the slot area just as the far winger passed the puck into him. He turned, and slammed the puck into the far corner of the Falcon goal. The Dynamo fans went wild. The horn sounded, ending the game. Dynamos 3, Falcons 2. Leigh looked across at her team's bench, but no one even glanced her way. After a quick handshake for the winning team, the Falcon players grabbed their equipment and headed for the dressing room. Leigh didn't need to be there to know what the guys were saying. As the only girl on the team, she changed in the women's washroom, and right this minute, she was glad she didn't have to face her teammates. Leigh sighed. Letting your whole team down by pulling a stupid penalty and losing the game was a poor start to the NHL career she dreamed of. She wondered if Manon Rh?aume had ever messed up and cost her team the game. She took off her shoulder pads and threw them at her equipment bag. She hadn't meant to high-stick the guy. It had been an accident. She tossed her chest and back pads at the growing pile of equipment. Cooper helmet with cage, jersey, neck guard, elbow pads, Koho gloves, pants, shin pads, girls' can, long underwear, not to mention Bauer skates, aluminum sticks, extra blades, and other assorted stuff made quite a sight. Why hadn't Jimmy let her take her shot? Did he think she was that poor a player? She pulled on her jeans and T-shirt, then started stuffing her pile of equipment in her bag. This had been their last game of the regular season. Losing to the Dynamos hadn't been the best way to end it, but they had still placed well enough in the standings to have secured a spot in the All City Championship. The championship had been the dream of the whole team, and everyone had worked hard to get this far. Now all they had to do was win the playoff series and they'd take the coveted title. No problem! They were the Fore

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Outcasts of River Falls

Outcasts of River Falls

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Rink Rivals

Rink Rivals

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Chapter 1 The roar of the huge aircraft's jet engines filled the air as it began the final approach to the runway. Thirteen-year-old twin brothers Evan and Brynley Selkirk exchanged looks. They were finally arriving in Calgary, Alberta after a long and exhausting flight. Evan sat next to his mother, Julianne. She reached over and pushed his lanky hair out of his hazelnut brown eyes in a familiar gesture which she'd made since he was a small boy. "We made it." She smiled at her son and patted his hair down. Evan frowned at his mom for the babyish gesture. His mom, who was a James Bay Cree, had dark brown hair like his, but hers was thick and shiny and looked great, while his just seemed to hang limply straight down, usually into his eyes, which was why his mom was always fussing with it. His skin was dark like hers, but where she was short and fine-boned, he was built more like his dad?tall and sturdy. It was because of his mom that they were moving from their home in the tiny isolated community of Whapmagoostui, Quebec. She was a lawyer and had accepted a new job with a top-notch firm here in Calgary. Whapmagoostui, on the east coast of Hudson Bay, was a very long way from Calgary. As the plane broke through the clouds, Evan looked out the window at the tiny houses flashing by below. Calgary, situated where the prairie meets the mountains, was surrounded by a colourful patchwork of flat farm fields to the east and rolling foothills climbing up the shoulders of the Rockies to the west. Occasional drifts of gleaming snow reminded Evan it was early November and winter, even this far south. The gently rolling prairie stretching off into the distance was quite a change from the endless grey, frigid waters of Hudson Bay. And here, he noticed, there were roads absolutely everywhere. Back home, they had few roads because there were very few cars to use them. In the summer, people drove quads'small, four-wheeled, all-terrain vehicles?and in the winter everyone used snowmobiles. Evan looked past his mother to his brother, Bryn. Blonde with ice-blue eyes and a fine bone structure, Evan's brother looked like a poster boy for Angels Anonymous. He and his brother had never gotten along and seldom saw eye-to-eye on anything. It wasn't Evan's fault; he was the normal one. For instance, Evan lived for hockey, which was completely cool for a thirteen-year-old guy, whereas his wimpy brother Bryn didn't play hockey. In fact, Bryn didn't do any sports; instead, he played the piano?a lot. Just then, Bryn glanced up from his book and caught Evan looking at him. He gave Evan a dirty look. Evan ignored his brother, pretending instead to be looking at his dad, Thomas, who was sitting in the next bank of seats. His dad, who was usually neat and precise in his appearance, was now distinctly rumpled after the tiring flight. His shirt was creased and his curly blonde hair looked as if he'd just climbed out of bed. There were dark smudges under his pale blue eyes. He had been the only white elementary school teacher in Whapmagoostui and had been well-liked by his students. Stuck in the aisle seat, Bryn had to lean forward to peer out the small window for his first glimpse of their new home. "Look at the size of this place!" he exclaimed when he saw the rows upon rows of houses. His eyes were shining. "Calgary's so big, I bet they have their own philharmonic orchestra." Evan rolled his eyes. He knew his brother loved music. It was probably because for as long as Evan could remember, Bryn had songs playing in his head, like background music in a movie. In Evan's books, this made Bryn a freak because of the way he was always tuned in. His brother said his brain and body seemed to work faster with his private music playing. Bryn started to bob his head up and down and Evan knew he was listening to his head music. It was probably a boring piano piece. Bryn planned on being a classical pianist when he grew up and would torture Evan by practising for hours. The two boys gave each other one last glare, then sat back in their seats and waited for the long journey from their old home to end. The plane touched down with a gentle bump. Their new adventure was about to begin. *** The weekend was spent moving into their house and arranging for the boys' new school. Slouching against the doorjamb of his brother's new room, Evan watched Bryn struggle with a large poster. "You're not going to put those stupid things up, are you?" he asked, folding his arms and nodding at the stack of posters waiting on Bryn's bed. His brother scowled. "I'll put up whatever I like in my room." He nodded toward the pile of posters, which held portraits of such famous composers as Mozart, Pachelbel, and Chopin. "These geniuses have stood the test of time and come out on top." He finished hanging the large poster. "Ludwig van B., here," he jerked his thumb at the picture of Beethoven, "happens to be my hero." Evan scoffed. "Yeah, right. Only s

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Secret Signs

Secret Signs

edition:Paperback
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This was not how he'd imagined today would go, but he wouldn't let anyone, not even his mother, tell him what to do. Like his hero, Tom Sawyer, Henry would seek his fame and fortune in the wide world. Maybe he couldn't hitch a ride on a Mississippi riverboat, but he could take a page out of Tom's book and live by his wits and by his own rules.

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The Comic Book War

The Comic Book War

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tagged : superheroes
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