About the Author

Cindy Day

Meteorologist Cindy Day has a passion for the weather that goes back to her rural roots. She grew up on a dairy farm in Bainsville Ontario. Surrounded by nature and influenced by wise parents and a grandmother with a keen sense for forecasting the weather, Cindy become an eager, curious student. Armed with weather lore and lots of questions...her quest began. With a career that spans more than 25 years, it's safe to say that Cindy has covered the weather from every angles. It all started with Environment Canada, briefing pilots at the MacDonald Cartier Airport in Ottawa. That led to a media career that began with CFRA radio, hosting a program called Ottawa AM. She was the first full-time meteorologist on private radio in Canada. She eventually created her own business - "Weather by Day" - providing seasonal forecasts, climate data and radio reports for Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec.Cindy made the Maritimes her home in 1998 when she joined the Global News team. In 2007 she took on new challenges with a move to CTV. When Cindy is not analyzing weather charts, you might find her on the golf course in the summer or catching snowflakes on her tongue in the winter. Her passion for good food leads her to local markets then right back to the kitchen where she loves to create fabulous meals. She's an avid hockey fan, or should I say an admitted Montreal Canadiens groupie!

Books by this Author
Grandma Says

Grandma Says

Weather Lore From Meteorologist Cindy Day
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
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Excerpt

RAIN BEFORE SEVEN, FINE BY ELEVEN

Grandma was an early riser. In fact I don't think I ever heard an alarm clock go off in her bedroom. She was up with the roosters!

When the day got off to a rainy start, she would tell us that before long, the rain would stop: "Rain before 7, fine by 11". 

 

This is one of those weather sayings that is not always correct but it is often right and it can be explained with a quick look at a weather map.

Some systems are more active at certain times of the day. A cold front is often made more powerful with the benefit of daytime heating, especially if the sun is out. Cold fronts trigger those dramatic late day thunderstorms that we sometimes experience at the end of a hot summer day. A few hours after sunset, a lot of that energy subsides.

                                                                                              A warm front on the other hand has a much more gentle approach. It's a slower moving wide band of moisture that comes in to replace cooler air. Because the warm air is less dense, it slides up and over the colder air; condensation occurs and rain falls behind the front. That process is helped along by the cooling of the air after sunset. The slow moving system can take as long as 12 hours to move through, so if the rain began at sunset, it should be on its way out shortly after sunrise. Once the front passes, the sky clears and the air pressure rises. Temperatures also rise as warm air replaces cold air.                                                                              So if you wake up to the sound of light rain dancing on the roof, don't despair,the day might not be right off after all. Grandma would tell you that there's a good a chance that rain could end before noon with some sun to brighten the rest of your day.

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Grandma Says (pb)

Grandma Says (pb)

Weather Lore From Meteorologist Cindy Day
edition:Paperback
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Excerpt

"In meteorological circles autumn is known as a shoulder season. It's like a buffer between summer and winter. In some parts of the country it can be rather brief. One or two good blasts of arctic air and voila, winter settles in."

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Deep Freeze Winter 2015

Deep Freeze Winter 2015

A Photographic Memory of Storm, Survival and Triumph
edition:Paperback
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