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Religion Worship & Liturgy

Pastoral Prayers to Share Year A

Prayers of the people for each Sunday of the church year

by (author) David Sparks

Publisher
Wood Lake Publishing
Initial publish date
Oct 2010
Category
Worship & Liturgy, Prayer, General
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781551455853
    Publish Date
    Oct 2010
    List Price
    $29.95
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781770642881
    Publish Date
    Oct 2010
    List Price
    $9.98

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Description

 

 

"So what are we about as pastoral pray-ers? We are about bringing ourselves individually and as a faith community into right relationship with God..."

 

What about a Revised Common Lectionary based book of pastoral prayers for clergy and lay leaders that provides responsive prayers for each Sunday of the year. David gets asked this question often when people recognize him as the author of the three volumes of Prayers to Share. So, acknowledging that the pastoral prayer is often overlooked and undervalued, and that clergy and lay leaders may be hard-pressed for time to compose a fresh pastoral prayer each week, he has put together a unique and comprehensive collection of prayers, based on the Revised Common Lectionary Year A, that can be adapted to present circumstances and used in a variety of settings.

 

The prayers are responsive, written for one or two leaders and a congregational response. They all allow for the inclusion of local and worldwide current events, and individual and congregational concerns. David usually uses the weekly Gospel reading as the broad theme for the prayers and divides them into four easily identified sections: world, suffering, church, and ourselves.

 

The "how to use" section covers preparing to offer pastoral prayer, and offers 12 ways to "do" pastoral prayer, such as: two leader congregational response, using people and objects to dramatize a theme, using part of a hymn for a lead or a response, or using silence for effect

 

Other features include a thematic index, a scripture index, icons in the margin to enable quick identification of prayer sections and alternate suggestions, as well as a Data CD with text files.

About the author

David Sparks has served as a minister for 38 years in The United Church of Canada and the United Reformed Church of England and Wales. He has written six books of lectionary-based prayers in the Prayers to Share and Pastoral Prayers to Share series (Wood Lake Books) and his hymns have been published in hymn books in Canada and USA. Sparks has led workshops on various aspects of public prayer. Now retired, he lives with his wife in British Columbia.

David Sparks' profile page

Excerpt: Pastoral Prayers to Share Year A: Prayers of the people for each Sunday of the church year (by (author) David Sparks)

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ADVENT 2

 

Lectionary Readings

 

Isaiah 11:1–10
Psalm 72:1–7, 18–19
Romans 15:4–13
Matthew 3:1–12

 

John the Baptizer appears out of the desert, a confrontational, charismatic, prophetic figure.

 

How we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
On Jordan’s bank, men and women were given a vision of a new realm.
We pray for the prophets of today:
the prophets who speak out for clean water and unpolluted air,
the prophets who warn of the extinction of plant and animal species,
the prophets who expose the horrors of child labour wherever it is found,
the prophets who expose the commercial focus of this holy time.
And though we need to listen to our own prophets,
how we wish
we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
How we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
On Jordan’s bank was a crowd of people seeking radical change in their life’s direction.
We pray for those who face medical conditions that are difficult to diagnose or treat.
We pray for those who are held back by guilt over past wrongs, and for those who need the help of another to reveal their hidden gifts and talents.
We pray for those in spiritual crisis, who seek renewal and inspiration in their shadowed times.
We pray for those who find life fragmented and overwhelming.
We pray for those who are sick, for whom each new day is a struggle.
We pray for those who have lost loved ones and find it hard to break out of the tomb of bereavement (time of silent reflection).
As we pray that forgiveness and empowerment will be the reality for ourselves and for our friends,
how we wish
we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
How we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
On Jordan’s bank was a crowd who glimpsed Jesus, God’s Holy One, who would transform their lives.
The ministry of Jesus began with John. We remember that we stand in the faithful tradition of the Baptized One.
The ministry of Jesus began with John. We rejoice that we stand in the compassionate tradition of the Baptized One.
The ministry of Jesus began with John. We rejoice that we stand in the just and prophetic tradition of the Baptized One.
As we seek to play our part in the faith community, as we remember the vocation of Christian ministry,
how we wish
we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
 
How we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
The questions call us to respond.
Can we make the turnaround to which we are called?
Are we ready to listen to the voice of the prophets?
Have we the commitment to step forward confidently?
Can we recognize Christ in the needy crowd around us? (Time of silent reflection.)
As we struggle with the questions,
how we wish
we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
Another Way

  1. Sing a verse of one of the John the Baptizer hymns, such as On Jordan’s Bank (Voices United #20) after each section.
     
  2. Turn this into a fully responsive prayer.
    How we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank!
    On Jordan’s bank was a crowd who glimpsed Jesus, God’s Holy One, who would transform their lives.
    The ministry of Jesus began with John. We remember that we stand in the faithful tradition of the Baptized One.
    The ministry of Jesus began with John. We rejoice that we stand in the compassionate tradition of the Baptized One.
    The ministry of Jesus began with John. We rejoice that we stand in the just and prophetic tradition of the Baptized One.
    As we seek to play our part in the faith community, as we remember the vocation of Christian ministry,
    how we wish we could have been on Jordan’s bank.

    Follow the same pattern for the other sections.
     

  3. The worship leader dresses up as John the Baptizer and wears a rough coat, sandals, and a wild look.

Other titles by David Sparks