On a book page, this tab will allow you to add a book to one of your lists.
Please login or register to use this feature.
9781926743790_cover Enlarge Cover
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $9.99
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
category: Fiction
published: Nov 2016
ISBN:9781926743790

I Am a Truck

by Michelle Winters

reviews: 1
tagged:
add a tag
Please login or register to use this feature.
literary, contemporary women, small town & rural
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $9.99
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback
category: Fiction
published: Nov 2016
ISBN:9781926743790
Description

A tender but lively debut novel about a man, a woman, and their Chevrolet dealer.

Agathe and Réjean Lapointe are about to celebrate their twentieth wedding anniversary when Réjean’s beloved Chevy Silverado is found abandoned at the side of the road—with no trace of Réjean. Agathe handles her grief by fondling the shirts in the Big and Tall department at Hickey’s Family Apparel and carrying on a relationship with a cigarette survey. As her hope dwindles, Agathe falls in with her spirited coworker, Debbie, who teaches Agathe about rock and roll, and with Martin Bureau, the one man who might know the truth about Réjean’s fate. Set against the landscape of rural Acadia, I Am a Truck is a funny and moving tale about the possibilities and impossibilities of love and loyalty.

Awards
  • Long-listed, Scotiabank Giller Prize
Editorial Review

“The wonder-packed drama of I Am a Truck plays itself out in the impossible intersection of a Coen brothers movie, a James M. Cain novel and a Looney Tunes feature. Michelle Winters has created a fresh novel overflowing with mystery, emotional complexity and a new and welcome breed of goofy charm.”

— Stuart Ross, author of Snowball, Dragonfly, Jew

Buy the e-book:

Reader Reviews

Sign Up or Sign In to add your review or comment.

Odd short novel with strong characterization

So this was an exceedingly odd read. If strange books are your jam, definitely pick it up. It's a short (but not necessarily quick) read set . . . actually, I'm not even sure. In a French-speaking small town and rural area somewhere in Canada. It's the most Francophone book in English I've ever read, with quite a bit of untranslated dialogue that dovetails nicely with telling details for a remarkable sense of place. I took quite a bit of French in school and could make out the gist of most of the comments - no idea if they'd be a barrier to someone completely unfamiliar with the language or not. I think you get most of it from context anyways? In terms of characters, the perspective is mostly that of a middle-aged stay-at-home wife who loses the husband she's been with since they were teens and starts exploring the idea of a world and identity without him. There's also a bit from the husband's perspective, and the husband's friend.

I think it helps if you look at the book more as a sort of extended short story than a novel. It's a collection of extended character sketches. It portrays quirky, instantly-recognizable personalities that are funny, sad, and at times alarming. It's a sympathetic portrayal, but also awkward in its intimacy. The ending is abrupt and open-ended. I didn't appreciate it, but some might, depending on how you take the message it sends. It's very literary, and the book does exhibit some cohesiveness in that its form follows its content almost too neatly. So yeah, if you're into strange, literary Canadian writing, pick up this lightweight, award-winning paperback and explore the stubbornly odd world of rural Francophone Canadiana.

Related Blog Posts

User Activity

X
Contacting facebook
Please wait...