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Fiction Literary

How I Spent My Summer Holidays

Penguin Modern Classics Edition

by (author) W.O. Mitchell

Publisher
McClelland & Stewart
Initial publish date
Sep 2018
Category
Literary, Coming of Age, Classics
  • Audio disc

    ISBN
    9780864924759
    Publish Date
    Jan 2008
    List Price
    $29.95
  • Audio cassette

    ISBN
    9780864922588
    Publish Date
    Aug 1998
    List Price
    $22.95
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9780735236042
    Publish Date
    Sep 2018
    List Price
    $22.95
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9780771061103
    Publish Date
    Mar 2000
    List Price
    $22.99

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Description

When How I Spent My Summer Holidays was first published in 1981 a Western reviewer wrote: “If Who Has Seen the Wind told the story of a young boy’s coming to terms with death, How I Spent My Summer Holidays tells of a young man’s attempt to come to terms with his own sexuality and that of the world around him.”

The twelve-year-old young man is Hugh, and in small-town Saskatchewan it is the hot summer of 1924. When Hugh and his friends dig a secret cave out on the Prairie, they soon find it occupied by an escaped patient from the mental hospital. Defying the adult world, the boys become involved with a former war hero and current rum-runner, King Motherwell, in sheltering and feeding the runaway. When passions aroused by sex explode into murder, Hugh leaves his boyhood behind him for ever.

About the author

W.O. Mitchell is one of the most recognized Canadian authors of the last century. He was born in Weyburn, Saskatchewan in 1914, and during a varied career he was everything from a Depression hobo to the fiction editor of Maclean's. His best-loved book, Who Has Seen the Wind (1947) is hailed as the quintessential Canadian coming-of-age novel. Other works include Jake and the Kid (1961), The Kite (1962), The Vanishing Point (1973), How I Spent My Summer Holidays (1981), Since Daisy Creek (1984), Ladybug, Ladybug (1988), According to Jake and the Kid (1989), Roses are Difficult Here (1990), For Ark's Sake (1992), An Evening with W.O. Mitchell (1997) and the play The Black Bonspiel of Willie MacCrimmon (1993). He won the Leacock Medal for Humour for Jake and the Kid and again for According to Jake and the Kid. Mitchell was made an officer in the Order of Canada in 1973 and has been the subject of an NFB documentary entitled W.O. Mitchell: A Novelist in Hiding.

W.O. Mitchell's profile page

Editorial Reviews

“Moving, vivid and exciting…a beautiful, rich and utterly fascinating novel.”
–Windsor Star

“Bawdy and raunchy…an uncannily accurate feel for the emotional viewpoint of a 12-year old boy.”
The Globe and Mail

“Astonishing.…Mitchell turns the pastoral myth of prairie boyhood inside out.”
Toronto Star

Other titles by W.O. Mitchell