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A blog on Canadian writing, reading, and everything in between

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The Interruption with Marianne Apostolides

The Interruption with Marianne Apostolides

[March 25, 2015] | By [Sean Cranbury]

Today Sean Cranbury chats with Marianne Apostolides, author of the provocative, sensual new novel Sophrosyne (BookThug).

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Your 2015 Guide to Spring Literary Festivals

[March 24, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

Sure sign of spring? Literary festivals are kicking off across the country. Find one near you or, even better, plan a we …

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Book Cover One Hundred Days of Rain

Carellin Brooks: Olde Tyme Reading Right Now

[March 23, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

Live in the now. Put on a homburg. 

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Notes From a Children's Librarian: Fostering World-Mindfulness

Notes From a Children's Librarian: Fostering World-Mindfulness

[March 22, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

Any of these books would inspire a young reader to look outside themselves, mindful of a world where children’s lives …

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Book Cover My Mother's Daughter

Rona Maynard on Mental Illness and the REAL Talking Cure

[March 20, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

Public perceptions of mental illness have changed enormously in just the last two decades. 

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Mae's Kitchen, Chicken in the Mango Tree

Thai Rainy Season: How to Catch a Fish With Your Hands

[March 19, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

In Chicken in the Mango Tree, bestselling food writer Jeffrey Alford gives unique view of rural Thai food culture. 

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Quick Hits: Dirt, Time Travel, Love, and Gossip

Quick Hits: Dirt, Time Travel, Love, and Gossip

[March 18, 2015] | By [Kiley Turner]

In Quick Hits, we look through our stacks to bring you books that, when they were published, elicited a lot of reaction …

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Book Cover A Migrant Heart

Denis Sampson: On the Paucity of Irish-Canadian Memoir

[March 17, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

"My contribution from my small world of Montreal and Ireland is part of that work of imagining the integration and cohab …

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Book Cover Red Jacket

Pamela Mordecai: Novels of the Caribbean

[March 16, 2015] | By [Kerry Clare]

Mordecai, whose new book is Red Jacket, shares 9 novels by Canadian-Caribbean women.

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Shelf Talkers: March 2015

Shelf Talkers: March 2015

[March 13, 2015] | By [Rob Wiersema]

Drip, drip, drip ... Canada is beginning to thaw, and with a new season bursting out, we need new books to celebrate. Th …

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The Interruption with Marianne Apostolides

BOTR_MARCH_2014_SQUARE

Hi everyone! Welcome back to The Interruption, a 49th Shelf–Books on the Radio collaboration in which I interview Canadian writers about the surprising things that inform, inspire, and even interrupt their creative process. Today I chat with Marianne Apostolides, author of the provocative, sensual new novel Sophrosyne (BookThug).

Marianne is a prolific author whose other works include Voluptuous Pleasure: the Truth About the Writing Life, and Swim: a Novel, both also from BookThug. In this really excellent conversation Marianne discusses how Sophrosyne "made [her] psyche crackle a bit," the mystery of how a narrative unfolds for her, the difficulty of restraint and self-mastery in a digital age, and how she abandoned the manuscript for Sophrosyne ... and what brought her back to it.

The Interruption always features two podcast selections for your listening enjoyment: the first podcast features my interview with Marianne. The second podcast features a unique reading from Sophrosyne. Thank you for listening.

*****

  
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Your 2015 Guide to Spring Literary Festivals

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Here's a sure sign of spring: Literary Festivals are kicking off across the country. Use our guide to find out what's going on near you, or to pick the perfect destination for a literary mini-break. 

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Until May, the Vancouver Writers Fest, in partnership with the Vancouver Public Library, runs Incite, free twice-monthly readings by writers including Deni Béchard, Jane Urquhart and Emily Urquhart, Russell Smith, Guy Vanderhaeghe and more. Versefest is back in Ottawa from March 24-30 (right now!), with Lorna Crozier, Nicole Brossard, Daphne Marlatt, Paul Vermeersch, Sandra Ridley and so many poets from Canada and elsewhere on their fantastic roster. 

Logo GritLit

Great bookish things are happening in Picton, ON, from April 15-18, for the Prince Edward County Authors Festival, this year with Christine Fischer-Guy, Helen Humphreys, Frances Itani Sean Michaels, Shani Mootoo, and Leigh Nash. We're thrilled that GritLit returns to Hamilton, ON, this year, with events throughout April and the main program taking place April 16-19. You'll be able to catch Claire Cameron, Step …

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Carellin Brooks: Olde Tyme Reading Right Now

One Hundred Days of Rain

Carellin Brooks is the author of One Hundred Days of Rain. Mourning her recent disastrous breakup, its narrator must rebuild a life from the bottom up. As she wakes each day to encounter Vancouver's sky and city streets, the narrator notices that the rain, so apparently unchanging, is in fact kaleidoscopic. Her melancholic mood alike undergoes subtle variations that sometimes echo, sometimes contrast with her surroundings. Caught between the two poles of weather and mood, the narrator is not alone: whether riding the bus with her small child, searching for an apartment to rent, or merely calculating out the cost of meager lunches, the world forever intrudes, as both a comfort and a torment.

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Lots of writers like to live in the now. Their characters drink green smoothies and go to Pilates. When I began writing my latest novel, One Hundred Days of Rain, I didn’t exactly strive for the opposite, but I did find some old skool language, to use the technical term, creeping in. I’m still not sure why: because rain feels so, well, 19-century in terms of its unavoidability? Because we haven’t entirely conquered weather? All I know is what I saw taking shape on my screen: characters wearing homburgs (a hat type my copy editor suggested, to my delight, was rather too …

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Notes From a Children's Librarian: Fostering World-Mindfulness

Our Children's Librarian columnist, Julie Booker, brings us a new view from the stacks every month.

*****

Book Cover If the World Were A Village

How do you foster world-mindfulness in children? With a good wall map that's referred to often. This is one of the great tips found at the end of If the World Were a Village: A Book About the World's People (2nd edition), by David J. Smith and Canadian illustrator Shelagh Armstrong. It asks, "What if the world's population were a village of 100 people?" Each page answers using one aspect of the global village, i.e., nationality (60 would be from Asia; five would be from Canada/US); language (only nine would speak English); age (37 would be under 19); and food (there would be seven times as many chickens as people). The inequities become profoundly obvious when it comes to access to clean air and water, school, work, money, and possessions. Beautifully illustrated, this large picture book is recommended for grades four and up. 

Ryan and Jimmy and the Well in Africa That Brought Them Together, by Herb Shoveller, is non-fiction told in story form. It begin …

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Rona Maynard on Mental Illness and the REAL Talking Cure

Book Cover My Mother's Daughter

Talking History focuses on a wide range of topics in Canadian history, and it consists of articles by Canada's foremost historians and history experts. Our contributors use the power of narrative to bring the past to life and to show how it is not just relevant, but essential to our understanding of Canada and the world today. "Talking History" is a series made possible through a special funding grant from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Rona Maynard has been a champion for mental health since 1997. When a suicide call turned up on her voicemail at Chatelaine, where she was Editor, she knew she had found her mission. The magazine’s award-winning health journalism reflected Rona's conviction that an illness of the mind deserves equal time with an illness of the body.

*****

Early in my tenure as Editor of Chatelaine, I let my readers in on a secret. I had suffered from depression that took hold of me in childhood and did not let go until my mid-30s. In its grip, I hid behind a mask of competence—meeting every deadline as a busy freelance writer and making fettuccine from scratch because my family deserved the best. No one saw me spend entire days crying.  At my lowest low, I realized that I couldn’t keep up my charade. Terrified of being exposed as a fraud, I …

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