386 Results for “the recommend”




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The Recommend for September

tagged : The Recommend

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we run this series, The Recommend, where readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Mike Petrou, Maclean's journalist and award-winning author of Is This Your First War? Travels Through the Post-9/11 Islamic World; Frances Peck, partner with West Coast Editorial Associates and author of Peck's English Pointers; Jennifer Kervin, TO-based bookseller and publishing professional; Christine Fischer Guy, author of the new novel, The Umbrella Mender, and many acclaimed short stories; and Steve Stanton, author and former president of Canada's national association of science fiction and fantasy authors.

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Mike Petrou picks Alistair MacLeod's The Lost Salt Gift of Blood

"Alistair MacLeod achieved his greatest international accolades for his first and only novel, No Great Mischief, published in 1999, but it is in his short stories, and especially those in his first collection, The Lost Salt Gift of Blood, that his writing is its most evocative, limpid, and heart wrenching.

'I am speaking now of a July in the ear …

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Indigenous Readers Recommend

Book Cover My Heart Fills With Happiness

In late December of 2015, Canada's Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Carolyn Bennett, proposed an Aboriginal book club month, creating an opportunity to promote reading indigenous authors. Three such authors (Tracey Lindberg, Lee Maracle, and Drew Hayden Taylor) met the following week to debate the merits of that idea on CBC's The Current, and to discuss the state of indigenous literature in Canada—their conversation was fascinating and you can listen to it here.

In this post, we would like to further the spirit of their discussion with Indigenous writers, artists and scholars recommending some of their essential reads. 

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Bearskin Diary, by Carol Daniels

Recommended by Richard Van Camp

I believe Carol Daniels is one of the most important voices in Canadian and World Indigenous Literature today. Her novel Bearskin Diary follows Sandy as she reclaims her culture and her spirit after surviving the Sixties Scoop. I wasn't expecting this novel to be so fearless, but it is. I could not put this book down.

I love Kenneth T. Williams' quote: "Bearsk …

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The Recommend: March 2015

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we run this series, The Recommend, where readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Robert Hough, author of the upcoming The Man Who Saved Henry Morgan; Nina Berkhout, author of The Gallery of Lost Species; Harry Karlinski, author of The Evolution of Inanimate Objects; Ann Dowsett Johnson, author of Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcoholand Steve Stanton, author and former president of Canada's national association of science fiction and fantasy authors.

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Robert Hough picks Black Bird, by Michel Basilières

"I’m not exactly sure how I discovered my favourite Canadian novel, though I’m pretty sure I have my editor at the time, a legend named Anne Collins, to thank. In my memory, we were at some industry party—likely a sweaty Harbourfront affair—when she pulled me over and, in a slightly conspiratorial voice, said, 'There’s a book coming out I think you’re going to like.'

The year was 2003. The title was Black Bird and it was the first title by a Montreal native named …

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The Recommend: March 2014 #1

tagged : the recommend

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we're starting our new series, The Recommend. Every two weeks, we'll reach out to people—readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others—whose taste we respect and ask them to tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Trevor Cole, author of Practical Jean; Farzana Doctor, author of Six Metres of Pavement; Cory Doctorow, author of Little Brother; Rolli, cartoonist and author of God's Autobio; and Mark Leslie Lefebvre, bookseller and author of Spooky Sudbury.

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Trevor Cole picks The Golden Mean, by Annabel Lyon: "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about this novel is the audacity and self-confidence Lyon displayed in even attempting it. Imagine daring to represent the mind of one of civilization’s greatest thinkers, as he writes about its greatest warrior. I shake my head in awe at that, and at her success. Her Aristotle is entirely believable, grounded by her obviously vast research, but also her understanding of human nature. He is immensely wise, yes, but also at times rash or prone to hubris. And Lyon manages to bring alive the intimate a …

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The Recommend: February 2014 #1

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we're starting our new series, The Recommend. Every two weeks, we'll reach out to people—readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others—whose taste we respect and ask them to tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Trena White, co-founder of Page Two and former publisher of Douglas & McIntyre; Missy Marston, author of the Ottawa Book-award winning The Love Monster; Trevor Corkum, contributing author to the very apropos short story collection, Friend. Follow. Text.; Alexis Kienlen, poet and agricultural journalist; and JC Sutcliffe, writer, editor, and translator.

*****

Trena White picks The Golden Spruce, by John Vaillant: "The Golden Spruce creates a riveting mystery out of a little-known event, outdoorsman Grant Hadwin’s massacre in the late 90s of a revered tree on Haida Gwaii. From that story, Vaillant jumps off into a wide-ranging, evocative history of the West Coast: the devastation European contact wrought among coastal First Nations, the rough-and-tumble logging camps, the dangers of felling coastal giants. He packs a phenomenal amo …

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The Recommend: May 2015

Most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we run this series, The Recommend, where readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Steve Burrows, author of the birder mystery, A Siege of Bitterns; Gail Bowen, author of the Joanne Kilbourn Shreve mysteries; Julie Joosten, author of the poetry collection Light Light; Diana Davidson, author of the historical fiction novel Pilgrimage; and Steve Stanton, author and former president of Canada's national association of science fiction and fantasy authors.

*****

Steve Burrows picks The Bedside Book of Birds: An Avian Miscellany, by Graeme Gibson

"As symbols and muses, omens and deities, birds have always been an inspirational part of the human experience. Graeme Gibson’s book is a fascinating overview of the many varied forms the relationship between birds and humans has taken throughout the ages. But this book is more than just a celebration of the positive. It examines the entire spectrum of the human connection with birds, and provokes sober reflection at times. Some of the entries are profoundly moving, even disturbing, b …

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The Recommend for September 2018

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we run this series, The Recommend, where readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This week we're pleased to present the picks of Sarah Selecky, author of Radiant Shimmering Light; Jennifer Robson, author of the forthcoming The Gown: A Novel of the Royal Wedding; Alix Hawley, author of My Name Is a Knife; Deborah Willis, author of The Dark and Other Love Stories; and Kerry Clare, author of Mitzi Bytes. IMPORTANT NOTE: This week's recommendations are part of a larger series launched in 2017 where we asked 150 Canadian authors to recommend 150 Canadian books. It's pretty awesome, so do check it out!

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Sarah Selecky recommends Sarah Henstra's Mad Miss Mimic

Readers of adult literary fiction might not have heard about this lovely book, because it’s officially published as teen and YA fiction. I recommend it to older readers, too! I loved getting lost in this subtle thriller about London in the 1870s, when the city was experiencing violent terror attacks and opium fever. This historical page-turner has everything: compelling characters, a love story, …

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The Recommend: September 2016

Research shows that most of the books we read are the result of one thing: someone we know, trust, and/or admire tells us it's great. That's why we run this series, The Recommend, where readers, writers, reviewers, bloggers, and others tell us about a book they'd recommend to a good friend ... and why.

This month we're pleased to present the picks of authors Caroline Adderson (Ellen in Pieces), Kate Taylor (Serial Monogamy), Edeet Ravel (The Saver), Anna Leventhal (Sweet Affliction), and Shari Lapeña (The Couple Next Door).

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Caroline Adderson recommends Kerry Lee Powell’s Willem de Kooning’s Paintbrush

Set in grody strip clubs and greasy spoons, peopled with “tramps and lunatics,” “an assortment of creeps and lowlifes with bad breath,” battered girlfriends, and Soviet-scarred chamber maids, this energetic collection presents a “raw humanity defiantly festive in the face of poverty and despair.” Powell, also a poet, is a painterly prose writer, not just in her many references to visual art, but her gorgeous images. One character lives alone in a sagging house “surrounded by the upturned scarabs of old snowmobiles.” A husband lurking in a dark corner is “filleted by shadows from the Venetian blinds.” But what makes this book so striking i …

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