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Books by Edmonton Authors

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A list of books written by authors that live or lived in Edmonton, AB, Canada.
The Man in Blue Pyjamas

The Man in Blue Pyjamas

A Prison Memoir
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook

The style of my book must be in small pieces, as my life has been in pieces. (Jalal Barzanji)

From 1986 to 1988 poet and journalist Jalal Barzanji endured imprisonment and torture under Saddam Hussein's regime because of his literary and journalistic achievements-writing that openly explores themes of peace, democracy, and freedom. It was not until 1998, when he and his family took refuge in Canada, that he was able to consider speaking out fully on these topics. Still, due to economic necessity …

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In the Suicide’s Library

In the Suicide’s Library

A Book Lover’s Journey
edition:Paperback
tagged : literary

When the hustle and bustle of modern life, the responsibilities of marriage and parenting, and the weight of middle-age get Tim Bowling down, he heads for a bookshelf in search of the solace books and reading can provide. But can the cure become the poison? One day, alone in the Modern Literature stacks of a university library, Bowling opens a tattered copy of Wallace Stevens’s poetry collection Ideas of Order and, on the front flyleaf, finds the elegant ownership signature of Weldon Kees?an o …

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The Annotated Bee and Me

The Annotated Bee and Me

edition:Paperback
tagged : canadian

A few years ago, while sorting through a box of family mementos, Tim Bowling discovered a slim volume which his Great Aunt Gladys Muttart had privately printed in 1961?a memoir of her family’s beekeeping adventures in Edmonton between 1906 and 1929. As he read and re-read the text of this little book, Bowling felt that “two very different ways of life, the early years of two very different centuries, began to merge, as if the past was something the present gathers from the fields on a summer …

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Body Trade

Body Trade

edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
tagged : literary

Body Trade follows Rosie and Tanya, two young Canadian women who decide to leave the Northwest Territories and head south on an ill-conceived road trip through California, Mexico and Central America. The story takes a life-defining twist when their search for freedom and adventure brings them into contact with predators of the Central American sex trafficking trade.

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Excerpt

Tanya sees Amos first, standing on shore with his legs spread wide. He’s waiting for them. She can see little puffs of dust coming off his dungarees as he taps his riding crop again and again. “Oh boy,” says Rosie, drawing back at the stern, trying to prevent the canoe from landing. “Tanya?” With nowhere else to go, she digs in, countering her stroke and pulling them up to the beach. Amos’s anger is a deep mahogany, his eyes the squished pulp of papaya. Thwack. The riding crop comes down just above Tanya’s hand as she steadies herself on the bow, preparing to leap to the sand. Thwack. He hits the boat again, enraged. “Who do you think you are?” he screams. Thwack. She scrambles past, collapsing her belly and chest into her shoulders and back in case he decides to strike, but no, he’s all drama. Rosie sits in the boat, now half in the water. She’s afraid to come in, but at least she’s out of reach of this lunatic. “You think you can do that to me? To me? Do you know who they are? Do you know what they can do to us here?” Thwack. Thwack. Again and again his wrist brings down the whip on the boat. Rosie scrambles to shore, but she’s jumped out of the boat too soon and trips in the soft shore gunk. She scrambles to her feet, but finally lurches past his raised arm, trailing the stink of the soupy sea and her own fear. The girls stand close together, a human wall against his fury. For Tanya it is a definitive moment. Everything goes soft around the edges and there is only his voice, screaming and swearing. He holds the trembling crop close to her face, the whites of his eyes huge and bulging. “You. I know this is you, Tanya. I’ll break you. You hear, puta de mierda? I’ll break you.” His spittle, like the foam of a rabid dog, lands on her cheeks and neck but she doesn’t brush it away. Tanya stands up to him, staring, toe-to-toe, eyeball-to-eyeball. She will not back down. Amos whips the crop again and she feels it whistle near her ear as her hair lifts and settles. He’s close. If he touches either of them, she’ll attack. Calm, girl, calm. Seconds pass. She opens her eyes, not realizing they were closed, yet still stands her ground. “You’ll pay for this, ” he hisses. “No woman makes a fool of me. You hear? No woman.” And with that he turns and marches towards the house. Tanya doesn’t move. She watches water pool in the small heel indentations Amos has left in the black sand. He’s gone. Rosie whistles. “Wow. He’s mad.” Tanya looks over. “Yeah,” she says flatly. “Mad, like a friggin’ madman. We better avoid that mother for a while, eh? Best we steer clear of Mr. A-man. Amos-shame most.” She knows she sounds braver than she feels. No way that piece of shit is going to feed them to his black pig bosses. No matter what the deal, no matter what he’s gone and promised, she and Rosie aren’t anyone’s snatch snack. They are not for sale. That night at suppertime Amos executes his slow punishment. He butchers one of the turtles, a treat for all of them after a straight week of fish, but when he divides it and hands around the coconut husk bowls, Tanya see he has given her turtle spawn, a mess of newly fertilized eggs. A slimy membrane sticks yellowy gelatinous eyeball-sized eggs together. Inside each translucent sack is the black bloodspot of the yet-to-be-hatched turtle. The eggs jiggle and dance in front of her. Amos loves it. He’s torturing her. He’s pushing as hard as he can without touching. Rosie gets the treatment, too, but not with such severity. Amos gives her the neck with the turtle’s head still attached. It’s gross, but at least there is meat on the neck. She breaks the head from the top vertebrae and starts to gnaw on the bony, boiled length of it. Tanya’s so hungry she feels faint, but the eggs stop her cold. Tony and Max eat slowly, their enjoyment squelched by Amos’s nastiness. She hates him. She hates him so much she takes those eggs and eats them while he watches. She doesn’t chew, she can’t chew, she just lets them slide down her throat like slippery blobs of fat, quick and slimy, and she never once takes her eyes off his. Defiance is the only way they will survive. Tanya thinks of Rosie’s kid David, how he ate those fuckin’ lichen to survive. She will eat anything to prove that she can’t be crushed. And it works. Amos, frowning, takes his own portion of turtle meat and leaves the fire to smoke or brood or plan his next move. Tanya leaps up and crabs her way over to the latrine. The vomit she can’t control means she has to taste the disgusting turtle eggs twice. She covers her puke quickly, so she doesn’t have to see, and as she lurches upright, Rosie is there. She leads her back to the fire where Max has prepared hot coconut milk. He pretends not to notice the tears that salt Tanya’s portion of rice. The next morning there is more punishment. Tanya gets served the head of a catfish, while Rosie, Max and Tony share the rest. She senses there is little pleasure for them eating. Tony’s eyes remain downcast. Maxi picks at his food, eats very little. What’s on her plate is a hideous thing. Amos has made a great show of serving it to her by lifting it by the snout whiskers and letting it hang, bloated, over-cooked and purplish grey, over her bowl. Again Tanya steels herself. She finds small pockets of flesh in front of the fins, snatches of tenderness at the cheeks. She forces those morsels out with her fingers, trying to avoid the sucker mouth and dead eyes of the catfish. “He’s trying to break you,” Rosie says later, smuggling a slice of breadfruit and a rice ball into her hand after the men have gone to check the traps. “He’s trying to starve you out. Are you okay, Tanya?” Tanya just nods, determined not to let him win, but at the same time wondering why it’s her he has chosen to punish and not Rosie.

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True Story

True Story

by Marty Chan
illustrated by Lorna Bennett
edition:Paperback
tagged : cats

True Story is about the boy who cried wolf, or in this case, cat. A sneaky kid blames his two tuxedo cats for causing the mess in his bedroom and disaster in the kitchen. When his kitties create a “cat-caphony? of noise at night, the boy claims he's innocent, but his pleas fall on deaf ears. His dad doesn?t believe him no matter how loudly he cries, “True Story.?

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The House with the Broken Two

The House with the Broken Two

A Birthmother Remembers
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook

Unmarried and pregnant in 1968 Winnipeg, teenager Myrl Coulter found herself at a loss. Unable (and perhaps unwilling) to support her child, Myrl's parents forced her to give the baby up for adoption. After being sent to a home for unwed mothers, Myrl gave birth in a desolate hospital room and then found herself at the mercy of the closed adoption process that seemed determined to punish her. Myrl was left numb and filled with questions that no one was able to answer. In 'The House with the Brok …

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The Half-Lives of Pat Lowther

The Half-Lives of Pat Lowther

edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback eBook
tagged : canadian, literary

Since her untimely death in 1975, the life and work of the Vancouver poet Pat Lowther have often been referred to as 'the Lowther legacy.' In The Half-Lives of Pat Lowther, Christine Wiesenthal seeks to convey what that legacy actually entails.

Combining biography with an analysis of literary and cultural history, Wiesenthal examines the critical legacy of a writer whose remarkable life and poetry have remained overshadowed by her notorious death. Working within a new form of biography, which emp …

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Bedlam

edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
tagged : literary
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