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list price: $20.00
edition:Paperback
category: Poetry
published: Sep 2011
ISBN:9781897141458
publisher: Pedlar Press

Post-Apothecary

by Sandra Ridley, edited by Beth Follett

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canadian
5 of 5
2 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $20.00
edition:Paperback
category: Poetry
published: Sep 2011
ISBN:9781897141458
publisher: Pedlar Press
Description

Sandra Ridley was a finalist for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry in 2009. Of her new work: "In minimal and carefully chosen language, Ridley mesmerizes. Each poem pays heed to the senses. When necessary, Ridley troubles syntax , but not in a heavy-handed way. Lines are built and broken, based on rhythm, image, sound. Ridley gives us mood, tone and exquisite detail enough to allow us to be compelled by her characters, but she hasn't gone overboard. She's given us spaces to fill in for ourselves." (Ottawa Poetry Newsletter) | Ridley: "

About the Authors
Sandra Ridley was co-winner of the bpNichol Chapbook Award for her chapbook Lift (JackPine Press) and was a finalist for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry in 2009. An earlier version of Fallout won the 2008 Alfred G. Bailey Prize. A past associate editor with Arc Magazine, and a facilitator of poetry workshops for the Tree Reading Series and the City of Ottawa, Ridley's work can also be found in such journals as The Antigonish Review, CV2, Fiddlehead, Grain, New Quarterly, Prairie Fire, RAMPIKE, and This Magazine, and as a chapbook titled Rest Cure published by Apt. 9 Press. Sandra Ridley grew up in Saskatchewan, and currently resides in Ottawa. This is her first full-length collection.
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Beth Follett is the founder and publisher of Pedlar Press, a Canadian literary house. Her first novel, Tell It Slant (Coach House Books, 2001), a retelling of Djuna Barnes’s 1936 novel Nightwood, met with critical acclaim. Her poetry, prose and nonfiction work have appeared in Brick, Best Canadian Poetry 2019, and elsewhere. She lives in St John’s, NL.

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Editorial Review

1. Ridley's poems veer from the terrifying to the tender, the comic and the apocalyptic, the ironic to the philosophical, and the cosmic to the domestic -- often within the same poem. This is an energetic and entertaining new voice in Canadian poetry both insightful and playful by turns. At the heart of *Fallout* is an elegiac tone that points to a more hopeful future. The book ends with an award winning sequence of ghazals written about the death of a young sister that leaves the reader breathless. - ELIZABETH PHILLIPS 2. Rest Cure by Sandra Ridley At long last I've had the opportunity to sit for a reasonable length of time with Rest Cure by Sandra Ridley (Apt. 9 Press, 2009). I suppose the primary question this long poem asks is how close to complete stillness can you get and still navigate a poem? It starts with a reliance on a propulsive and conjunctive language:Before running on nightshade & wormwood in a topiary maze. Before hawthorn punctures her arm: poison tipped. Before a peck of stones, she handpicks or pockets,she is camphor-doused& blindedby a fold of wool: wet & held tight to her eyes. The propulsion of "before" and the conjunctive "&" placed in a minimal context circling a present stillness that draws it up to a halt. If you get the thing done right as Ridley does here and as you might find, for example in much of the work of Anne Carson, what you get is a body that gives off a glow. An energy cast, appropriately, into a straightjacketing form that nonetheless beats at it, again appropriately, like blood through a vein. Beats against it and withdraws, and then repeats. Done repeatedly there's a structure of reverberation that affects every subsequent line exponentially. One of the things this allows the poem to do is to paradoxically expand its meaning as it progresses, even as the forms apparent on each page begin to contract, moving more and more closely to stillness, to individual heavy lines, to some that may fragment under their own weight, or need to be couched in even more stabilizing and stricter stanza forms. A language that might touch on the experiences of laudanum, ether, and hemorraging presented here. The Beckett trick, the minimalist paradox. You can call the whole thing Dionysius and Apollo instead if you like, I don't think it will mind. It's a paradox that also depends significantly on the propulsive, heady, and above all senuous quality of something like this: & yesterday was lamb's wool under her walking skirt& wasn't it or weren't they& didn't she hold a piece of him when she came herebefore she slipped listless & antiseptic This suggests that the dilemma of containment and particularly male containment of the female in the context of the poem's narrative is more complicated than it might appear in another writer. The experience of the voice in this poem is more ambiguous, her dream and waking lives as much languid and longing as troubled in a conventi onal sense, while always still the fine threat of violence resonant in lines like "Until his hypodermic drips & spins above her wrist-/ clockwise, he loves her." The line is balanced, is worked right to the edge of its length and is then drawn back slightly, leaving a degree of silence. A speech in containment that, by virtue of its containment, challenges most potently through silence, the echoing quality of a large room contained in a seemingly small voice. Well this is a story partly told by narrative suggestion (something a bit like Wide Sargasso Sea but stroking playfully at Sam Beckett territory), the primary vehicle for this story is sound and shape, as it should be, and arguably must be if Ridley is going to register something noteworthy in the direction of containment. She is very skilled at her craft, and has figured out some very eloquent ways to pull a sensibility from that craft that can sustain a long form. This joining of craft and the less tangible aspects of how a poem might mean are perhaps an obvious, one might say definitional aspect of poetry but I think it's something that otherwise talented writers spend a very long time figuring out how to approach. To see it here in full evidence so early on in a potential career is something to note and find encouragement in. Sandra Ridley is producing the good stuff and we would do well to hear it.A word needs to be said about the production that Cameron Anstee, working through his Apt. 9 Press, puts together to facilitate the poetic experience on tap here. Simple, elegant fonts, beautiful paper and streamlined covers bearing his handmade impress. Regardless of what one thinks of the poets he presents, no one can argue they aren't getting their money's worth in terms of the total object in their hands and the effect it might have on their ears: just showing and not telling, just raising the poems to our attention and not getting in the way. Any writer should wish for so simple and generous a treatment. 3. Here's what Sandra says about her work:"Post-Apothecary is a collection of poems that explore illness and how words can embody it on the page. These poems are language and image-based, to elicit a sense of disorientation as felt by the feverish mind. Folkloric remedies and experimental treatments for the ill are used as springboards into much of the work, and archaic terms and historic references are focal poetic devices.Playing with the boundary between language and lyric, experimental and confessional forms of writing, this manuscript is currently divided into four thematically-linked sections: Rest Cure, Apothecary, Phantasmagoria and Post-Apothecary. Liminal space, the fluid border between state-of-mind and state-of-body, in isolated and exiled treatment locales (like the sanatorium and the asylum) is a common thread.The first section, Rest Cure, is concerned with tuberculosis, and is built around one long poem that loosely details early curative procedures. On-site research at Fort San, one of Canada's first TB sanatoriums, grounded the work and served as a locational muse. Rest Cure sets the tone and prepares the reader for a pendulum swing to section two, much as one oscillates from coherent to not, when sick.Poems in section two and three, Apothecary and Phantasmagoria, work to generate a form of 'madness' on the page. Here, form and content influence each other. Emphasis is placed on discontinuity, distortion and fragmentation. Emotions are implied through montage. Colons link short imagistic phrases to suggest a tumbling dislocation from reality, or feverish thought, for both protagonist and reader. Therapeutic medicine and remedies found within a traditional apothecary surface within the imagery. Section two abandons the linear, while consciousness and reflective thinking take shape in section three.The fourth section, Post-Apothecary, sketches electroshock therapy as a treatment for mental illness. Weight is placed on protagonist affiliation with, and return to, the natural environment: a lake-side setting as a source of revelation, healing and regeneration. Using a serial poem approach, fragments are no longer isolated, but layer and coalesce. The reader assumes the role of seer. Images found in the first three sections gain body in the fourth, becoming vision. Two questions still to be addressed: How best to bear witness to the traumatic? And, How can the hidden be made visible?"

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