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Poetry Canadian

Min Hayati

by (author) Rayya Liebich

Publisher
Inanna Publications
Initial publish date
Jun 2021
Category
Canadian, Women Authors, Death
  • Paperback / softback

    ISBN
    9781771338714
    Publish Date
    Jun 2021
    List Price
    $18.95
  • eBook

    ISBN
    9781771338707
    Publish Date
    Jun 2021
    List Price
    $8.99

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Description

This collection travels through a daughter’s childhood memories in Montreal, her mother’s homeland of Lebanon, and the dark realities of grief across borders. Min Hayati uncovers the well of sorrow and the depth of love discovered only through loss. Poetry pays homage to the author’s maternal lineage, her mixed ethnicity, and the ways in which “mother” transcends all aspects of life.

Min Hayati advocates for a radical change in our approach to grief and the (still) taboo subjects of death, dying, and grief. Poems speak in particular to motherless-daughters around the world. Most importantly, the poet’s Arab roots sets her apart as a Canadian poet with a different story.

About the author

Rayya Liebich is an international award-winning Canadian poet of Lebanese and Polish descent. Passionate about writing as a tool for transformation, she teaches creative writing classes to youth, adults, and seniors. Her 2015 collection, Tell Me Everything, won the Golden Grassroots Chapbook Award. Winner of the Kootenay Literary Competition in 2005, the Geneva Literary Award in 2015, and the Richard Carver Award for emerging writers in 2019, her poetry has also appeared in a number of national and international journals. She has worked as a writer in residence through ArtStarts BC in six West Kootenay schools, and leads the Teen Creative Writing Club at the Nelson Public Library. She lives in Nelson, BC.

Rayya Liebich's profile page

Editorial Reviews

This collection travels through a daughter’s childhood memories in Montreal, her mother’s homeland of Lebanon, and the dark realities of grief across borders. Min Hayati uncovers the well of sorrow and the depth of love discovered only through loss. Poetry pays homage to the author’s maternal lineage, her mixed ethnicity, and the ways in which “mother” transcends all aspects of life.

Min Hayati advocates for a radical change in our approach to grief and the (still) taboo subjects of death, dying, and grief. Poems speak in particular to motherless-daughters around the world. Most importantly, the poet’s Arab roots sets her apart as a Canadian poet with a different story.