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list price: $6.75 USD
edition:Paperback
category: Computers
published: March 2011
ISBN:9780262515610
publisher: The MIT Press

Everyday Information

The Evolution of Information Seeking in America

contributions by Nathan L. Ensmenger; Gary Chapman; Angela Newell; Beth Nettels; Jeffrey R. Yost; Sara Metz; Rachel D Little; George Royer; Cecelia Williams; Jenna Hartel; Gesse Stark-Smith; James W. Cortada; Arturo Longoria; Jameson Otto, edited by William Aspray & Barbara M. Hayes

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information technology, social aspects
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $6.75 USD
edition:Paperback
category: Computers
published: March 2011
ISBN:9780262515610
publisher: The MIT Press
Description

An intimate, everyday perspective on information-seeking behavior, reaching into the social context of American history and American homes.

All day, every day, Americans seek information. We research major purchases. We check news and sports. We visit government Web sites for public information and turn to friends for advice about our everyday lives. Although the Internet influences our information-seeking behavior, we gather information from many sources: family and friends, television and radio, books and magazines, experts and community leaders. Patterns of information seeking have evolved throughout American history and are shaped by a number of forces, including war, modern media, the state of the economy, and government regulation. This book examines the evolution of information seeking in nine areas of everyday American life.

Chapters offer an information perspective on car buying, from the days of the Model T to the present; philanthropic and charitable activities; airline travel and the complex layers of information available to passengers; genealogy, from the family Bible to Ancestry.com; sports statistics, as well as fantasy sports leagues and their fans' obsession with them; the multimedia universe of gourmet cooking; governmental and publicly available information; reading, sharing, and creating comics; and text messaging among young people as a way to exchange information and manage relationships. Taken together, these case studies provide a fascinating window on the importance of information in the past century of American life.

About the Authors

Nathan L. Ensmenger

Nathan Ensmenger is Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.
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Gary Chapman

Nathan Ensmenger is Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.
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Angela Newell

Nathan Ensmenger is Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.
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Beth Nettels

Nathan Ensmenger is Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.
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Jeffrey R. Yost is Associate Director of the Charles Babbage Institute at the University of Minnesota, where he is also on the faculty of the Program in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine.
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William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
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William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

William Aspray is Bill and Lewis Suit Professor of Information Technologies in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the coeditor of Women and Information Technology: Research on Underrepresentation (2006) and The Internet and American Business (2008), both published by the MIT Press.
Author profile page >

James W. Cortada is Senior Research Fellow at the Charles Babbage Institute at the University of Minnesota and the author of Information and the Modern Corporation (MIT Press) and other books. He worked at IBM for thirty-eight years in sales, consulting, managerial, and research positions.
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James W. Cortada is Senior Research Fellow at the Charles Babbage Institute at the University of Minnesota and the author of Information and the Modern Corporation (MIT Press) and other books. He worked at IBM for thirty-eight years in sales, consulting, managerial, and research positions.
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Barbara M. Hayes is Associate Dean for Administration and Planning at Indiana University School of Informatics at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis.
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Barbara M. Hayes is Associate Dean for Administration and Planning at Indiana University School of Informatics at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis.
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Recommended Age, Grade, and Reading Levels
Age:
18 to 100
Grade:
13 to 17
Editorial Reviews

This book may well be of interest to undergraduates in a computing and society course, or anyone looking for insight into how people actually use the tools that have been developed over the last hundred years. It is appropriately full of fascinating nuggets of information, and is attractively produced.

Computing Reviews


Everyday Information is an important book for anyone who has wondered how we got through life before the Internet.

Nature

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